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Full text of "Synapsis: Philadelphia Campus"

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THE 



P- C. 0. LIBRARY 



Philadelphia College of Osteopathy \^ 





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TO THE STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF AND FRIENDS 









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DR O. J. SNYDER 

1899-1908 




DEAN C. J. MUTTART 
1908-1911 




With the incorporation of the Phihidelphia Col- 
lege and Infirmary of Osteopathy on the 24th of Janu- 
ary, 1899, came the realization of the dreams of its 
founders, Dr. O. J. Snyder and Dr. M. W. Pressly. 

The first classes were held in offices in the Stephen 
Girard Building, 21 So. 12th Street, by a faculty of 
seven professors. The first class of two stvidents gradu- 
ated in 1900. 

In 1902 Dr. James E. Burt served as Dean of the 
College, which was then located in larger quarters at 
the Witherspoon Building. The next year the college 
was relocated at 33rd and Arch Streets, and Dr. Charles 
W. McCurdy became Dean, filling the Deanship from 
1903-1908. 

From 1908 until 1916, the school was physically 
shifted to various locations within the city. During 
this period the Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelpha was 
incorporated and became a basic adjunct to the school. 

In 1911 when Dr. Arthur M. Flack, Sr., became 
Dean of the school, there were 250 graduates of the 
Philadelphia College and Infirmary scattered through- 
out the United States. By the year 1924 an equal 
number had been graduated. The school was now 
located adjacent to the 50-bed hospital in the vicinity 
of 19th and Spring Garden Streets. 

In January, 1929, a public campaign for funds 
met the needs for a new hospital and college building 
at its present site at Forty-eighth and Spruce Streets. 
The new college building was opened to classes Novem- 



DEAN A. M. FLACK, SR. 
1911-1924 



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ber 16, 1929, under the deanship of Dr. Edgar O. 
Holden. During his administration until 1943 a total 
of 13 50 students were graduated from the Philadelphia 
College of Osteopathy. 

Dr. Otterbein Dressier assumed the Deanship in 
1944 and served in that capacity until March, 195 0. 

After a period of adjustment, where the duties 
of the Dean were capably handled by various members 
of the administration and faculty. Dean Sherwood 
Mercer was installed on March 15, 1954. The alumni 
family of P.C.O. now totals 2368, including this class. 

In 1-951, the five buildings now comprising the 
North Center Division of P.C.O. were purchased, and 
have added appreciably to the clinical and hospital 
facilities available to the school.. Another important 
step in the progress of the school resulted from the 
amalgamation of the college and hospital in August, 
1953. The acquisition of a new school building site at 
Forty-seventh and Spruce Streets in November, 19 53, 
makes possible the expansion of the hospital at Forty- 
eighth and Spruce Streets by 200 beds. The new school 
building will be a six-story structure and will contain 
adequate facilities including laboratories and clinics. 

This briefly summarizes the rapid growth of our 
school, and its future seems well assured. It is hoped 
that the dreams and plans of its founders have been 
partially fulfilled, and that their traditions will be con- 
tinued by this and future graduating classes. 




DEAN E. O. HOLDEN 

1924-1943 




DEAN O. DRESSLER 
1944-1950 




DEAN S. R. MERCER 
1954- 




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• SITE OF NEW BUILDING 



PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE 
OSTEOPATHY 



Library-Cuss Rooms-Laboratories 






Mr. T. M. Rowland, Dr. F. H. Barth, Dr. H. W. 
Evans, Dean S. R. Mercer, Mr. J. De Angelis. 





DR. FREDERIC H. BARTH, 

Chairman, Board of Directors 



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BOARD OF DIRECTORS 





DR WILLIAM E. BRANDT 

President, 'Philadelphia College 

College of Osteopathy 



In years to come, this volume will stand on the shelves 
of every loyal son of PCO, Class of 1956, and hundreds of 
friends will see it and leaf through its pages. 

I know the editors have labored diligently to present in 
these pages a faithful record of the College as it stands, Anno 
Domini 1956, just past mid-century, approaching the cen- 
tennial of osteopathic foundation in the field of health, and 
with a wide vista opening up ahead. 

The pictures that are fresh and colorful to us today will 
then have taken on the glamour of the past and the aura of 
antiquity. I can speak from the other end of the scale, look- 
ing back nearly 50 years to my own year book in High School 
and College, and later PCO. When the work of the editors 
is well done, as herein, the backward glance into the past is 
as inspiring as the vistas which now open up ahead for the 
graduates of this year. 



Confucius said that, "Man who looks back sees his mis- 
takes piled up like mountains." It is, therefore, not too healthy 
to be looking backward as an habitual procedure. It is healthy, 
however, to look back and assay the degree of progress made in 
the intervening years. It is healthy to look back and to see in 
the records of the past the fundamental strength that served 
as the springboard for the advances in the intervening years. 
It is healthy to draw from the records of the past the inspira- 
tion which caused this book to be assembled and which imbued 
the hearts and minds of the editorial staff and the whole class 
in collaboration. 

""Mens et Manus," as our College seal puts it, the hand 
with the mind to guide it, does the work of osteopathic assist- 
ance to the body seeking health and recovery. Mind and heart 
and hand went to the making of this book. In recommending 
it to you, be you senior just graduating, or be you friend of 
the College interested in its output annually of trained physi- 
cians, I ask you to keep it and treasure it, and in the years to 
come check back at what is here unfolded to you and what the 
record of the intervening years has set down as the work and 
the progress contributed by these the members of the Class 
of 1956. 

PCO has had many great graduates. Its classes at the 
commencement season rally in greater or less numbers to the 
reunion bugle call of the Alumni Association. I know that 
when the Class of 1956 answers that call in the years to come, 
each member will bring back with him the treasures that he 
finds in his own book of memories, refreshed by the depiction 
of college scenes and college personalities in this the 1956 
Synapsis. 

To the class, we of the administration, the Dean, Regis- 
trar Rowland, the Faculty as a whole, extends its heartiest 
good wishes and its complete confidence that the record of the 
class in its work in the world will bring to fruition and enrich 
the progress of the osteopathic profession wherever its mem- 
bers work. Four years ago they were gathered together, 
strangers to each other, from many States and many college 
campuses. As they step out the doors of the College today, 
they are unified by that bond that can come only to a band of 
men when they have worked together shoulder to shoulder 
through the most vital four years of their educational life. 

William E. Brandt 



H. WALTER EVANS 
Board Secretary 



DR. THEODORE W. STEIGLER 
Director of Clinics 



DR. NICHOLAS D. TRETTA 
Student Health Physician 




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Commencement for the Class of 195 6 is an exciting 
occasion. It is time for congratulations — and well-deserved 
they are — on the assumption of the long-sought role of doctor, 
and for the beginning of the rewards which only he who has 
helped the ill back to health can know. 

The relationship of a graduate to his professional school 
is different from that of graduates of other types of institu- 
tions. In effect, a doctor can never leave his college. In the 
first wild break into freedom after four years of vigorous 
discipline some try to sever the tie. But it can't be done. 
There may be no overt relationship and negative — often un- 
happy — things are sometimes said or done. The tie cannot be 
severed. Whether he will or no the doctor's career will be 
affected not only by his training but also by the way his col- 
lege progresses and develops after he has been graduated. 

The Class of 1956 has as a group made a good record. 
P.C.O. looks forward to watching the class fulfill the promise 
which its undergraduate years have made manifest. P.C.O. 
confidently expects the Class of 19 56 to make a real contribu- 
tion to its chosen profession. This class has shown an increas- 
ing solidarity around and insight into the osteopathic approach 
to healing and health care. 

P.C.O. knows that the Class of 19 5 6 — along with all 
other classes — expects it to fulfill the promise which has made 
its history and which is generated by the dynamics of the 
philosophy of the osteopathic concept on which the college was 
founded. P.C.O. pledges itself to this task. In making this 
pledge P.C.O. is conscious of the togetherness which binds it 
to its graduates. Each member of the Class of 1956 his left 
part of himself here and he takes away part of the college. 
From this togetherness each gains strength and in this strength 
lies the promise of the fulfillment of the destiny of P.C.O. 
and of each doctor who calls her Alma Mater. 




(/Ummiskaim 



Sherwood R. Mercer 



THOMAS M. ROWLAND, JR., B.S. 
Director of Admissions and Registrar 



MARGUERITE ARCHER 
Assistant Registrar 



JOHN DE ANGELIS, B.C.S., M.C.S., C.P.A. 
ContptroUer 






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I do hereby affirm my loyalty to the profession I am about 
to enter. 

I will be mindful always of my great responsibility to 
preserve the health and life of my patients, to retain their confidence 
and respect, both as a physician and a friend who will guard their 
secrets with scrupulous honor and fidelity, to perform faithfully 
my professional duties, to employ only those recognized methods 
of treatment consistent with good judgment and with my skill and 
ability, keeping in mind always nature's laws and the body's inherent 
capacity for recovery. 

I will be ever vigilant in aiding the general welfare of the 
community, sustaining its laws and institutions, not engaging in 
those practices which will in any way bring shame or discredit upon 
myself or my profession. 

I will give no deadly drugs to any, though it be asked of me. 

I will endeavor to work in accord with my colleagues in a 
spirit of progressive cooperation and never by word or by act cast 
imputations upon them or their rightful practices. 

I will look with respect and esteem upon all those who have 
taught me my art. 

To my college, I will be loyal and strive always for its best 
and for the interests of the students who will come after me. 

I will be ever alert to and adhere to and develop the princ- 
iples of Osteopathy as taught by Andrew Taylor Still. 




/ swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and 
Hygeia, and Panacea, and all the gods, and goddesses that according 
to my ability and judgment. 

I Will keep this oath and this stipulation — to reckon him 
who taught me this art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my 
substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required to look 
upon his offspring in the same footing as my own brothers and to 
teach them this art if they shall wish to learn it. 

Without fee or stipulation and that by precept lecture, and 
every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the 
art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound 
by a stipulation and oath 

^According to the law of medicine but to none others, I will 
follow the system of regimen which, according to my ability and 
judgment, I consider 

For the benefit of my patients and abstain from whatever 
is deleterious and mischievous, I will give no deadly medicine to any 
one if asked nor suggest any such counsel, and in like manner I will 
not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. 

With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and 
practice my art. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, 
but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this 
work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the 
benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of 
mischief and corruption; and further from the seduction of females 
or males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever in connection with my 
professional practice or not in connection with it, I see or hear, in the 
0- life of men, which ought not to be spoken of abroad, 

I will not divulge as reckoning that all such should be kept 

secret. While I continue to keep this oath unviolated , may it be 

granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the art respected by 

If'POKRATH^ * "'^ "^^" '" "'^ times! But should I trespass and violate this oath, 

may the reverse be my lot! 



THE 



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3 







BLANCHE CLOW ALLEN, A.B., B.S. 
(Educ), D.O., Assistant Professor, 
Anatomy 

CLARENCE E. BALDWIN, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., 
Associate Professor, Hematology 

WILLIAM BALDWIN, JR., A.B., M.A. 
D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Professor — Chairman 
Physiology and Pharmacology 



WILLIAM M. BARNHURST, D.O., Asso- 
ciate Professor, Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology 

MEYER M. BELKOFF, A.B., D.O., Instruc- 
tor, Pediatrics 

SHERWOOD BERMAN, D.O., Demonstra 
tor. Pediatrics 



ALBERT BONIER, D.O., Associate, Surgery 





SPENCER G. BRADFORD, D.O., Associate 
Professor, Physiology and Pharmacology 



WILLIAM E. BRIGLIA, D.O., Clinical As 
sistant, Proctology 



SAMUEL BRINT, D.O., As- 
sociate, Obstetrics and 
Gynecology 

HAROLD L. BRUNER, D.O., 
F.A.C.O.I., Associate Pro- 
fessor, Allergy 

SAMUEL L. CARUSO, A.B., 
D.O., Demonstrator, Pedi- 
atrics 

ANGUS G. CATHIE, D.O., 
Professor — Chairman, 
Anatomy 



JOHN L. CIONCI, A.B., 
D.O., Assistant, Osteo- 
pathic Principles and Tech- 
niques 

DONALD E. CLARK, D.O., 
Professional Teaching Sup- 
ervisor, Clinics 

MICHAEL M. COLEMAN, 
D.O., Associate, Proctology 

GEORGE H. COURT, D.O., 
Associate, Surgery 



15 




FACULTY 



DAVID W. CRAGG, D.O., Demonstrator, 
Anatomy 

EDWIN H. CRESSMAN, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
Professor — Chairman, Dermatology and 
Syphilology 

WILLIAM F. DAIBER, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., 
Professor — Chairman, Osteopathic Medi- 
cine 



H. ENRICO D'ALONZO, D.O., Chief Sup- 
ervisor, Clinics 



HENRY A. D'ALONZO, D.O., M.Sc. (Sur- 
gery), Clinical Assistant, Surgery 



MORRIS DEGLIN, .B.S., Assistant— Cane 
Training Program, Pathology 



ANDREW D. DeMASI, D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), 
Instructor, Obstetrics and Gynecology 



STANLEY DORMAN, A.B., D.O., Assistant, 
Osteopathic Principles and Techniques 



JAMES M. EATON, D.O., LESTER EISENBERG, A.B., 

F.A.C.O.S., Professor, Or- D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), Associ- 

thopedic Surgery, Chair- ate Professor, Obstetrics 

man, Surgery and Gynecology 



EDWARD G. DREW, D.O., D.Sc.(Ost), 
F.A.C.O.S., Professor Emeritus, Gyne- 
cology 



LEMAR F. EISENHUT, JR., NICHOLAS C. ENI, B.S., 
D.O., Demonstrator, Anat- D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), Jnstruc- 

omy tor, Obstetrics and Gyne- 

cology 





i. WALTER EVANS, VICTOR R. FISHER, ARTHUR M. FLACK, DANIEL I. FORD, D.O., DEWAINE L. 

D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Clin- JR., A.B., D.O., Pro/cs- Assistant, Osteopathic D.O., Associ 

r.A.C.O.O.G., Obstetrics ical ' Professor, ' Osteo- sor — Vice-chairman, Principles and Tech- sor, Surgery 

and Gynecology, Medical , ,. . n,, ». .,.^ Q-,.^n^y^> nimies 

_. ^ -* ^■'^ pathic Meatcme burgery niqucs 

Director '^ 



GEDNEY, 
ite Profcs- 




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AND STAFF 



H. MAHLON GEHMAN, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
F.O.C.O., Professor, Ophthalmology 

ARNOLD GERBER, D.O., M.Sc.(OrthS) , 
Assistant Professor, Orthopedic Surgery 

FRANK E. GRUBER, D.O., Professor and 
Acting Chairman, Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology 



GEORGE H. GUEST, D.O., Associate, 
Neurology and Psychiatry 



JOSEPH E. GILETTO, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
Lecturer, Osteopathic Medicine 

CECIL HARRIS, D.O., F.A.C.N., Associate, 
Neurology and Psychiatry 



JOSEPH L. HAYES, D.O., Prof essor— Chair- 
man, Physical Therapy 



DAVID HEILIG, D.O., Clinical Professor, 
Osteopathic Principles and Techniques 



CHARLES A. HEMMER, A.B., D.O., Lec- 
turer, Anesthesiology 




HENRY B. HERBST, D.O., HARRY C. HESSDORFER, EDGAR O. HOLDEN, D.O., ALBERT C. KETTt, JR., 

Associate, Osteopathic Med- D.O., Assistant Professor, A.B., Litt.D., Professor, D.O., Lecturer, Ostotcpa- 

icine Osteopathic Medicine Chair m a 1i Osteopathic thic Medicine 

Principles and Techniques 




MEYER KIRSHBAUM, 
D.O., Demonstrator, 

Physiology 



HERMAN KOHN, D.O., OTTO M. KURSCHNER, 
Clinical Professor, Ob- A.B., D.O., Lecturer, 

stetrics and Gynecology Pediatrics 



WILLIAM H. LAND- PHILIP M. LESSIG, A.B., 

GREBE, D.O., Profes- M.A., D.O., Associate 

sional Teaching Super- Professor, Microbiology 

visor. Clinics and Public Health 








J. RAYMOND McSPIRIT, ARNOLD MELNICK, 

D.O., Professionul A.B., M.A., D.O., Asso- 

Teachiug Supervisor, date, Pediatrics 
Clinics 



ROBERT BAYARD MIL- 
LER, A.B., M.S., Assist- 
ant Professor, Anatomy 



J. ERNEST LEUZINGER, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
F.O.C.O., F.A.C.O.S., Professor — Chair- 
man, Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology 
and Bronchoesophagology 

ABRAHAM LEVIN, A.B., D.O., Associate, 
Surgery 

THEODORE A. LILJESTRAND, Courtesy 
Staff, Osteopathic Medicine 



PAUL T. LLOYD, D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), D.Sc. 
F.A.C.O.S., Professor — Chairman, Radi- 
ology 

THEODORE C. LOUX, D.O., Professional 
Teaching Supervisor, Clinics 



WILBUR P. LUTZ, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Pro- 
ftssor, Osteopathic Medicine 



EDWARD F. LYNCH, D.O., Clinical As- 
sistant, Proctology 

DOMINIC E. MARSICO, D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), 
Lecturer, Osteopathic Medicine 

ALPHONSO MASCIOLI, D.O., M.Sc.(Oto), 
Associate, Otorhinolaryngology and Bron- 
choesophaegology 



WILLIAM G. MORRIS, HERBERT R. MOSKOW, 

B.S., D.O., Assistant A.B., D.O., Staff, Pedi- 

Professor, Obstetrics atrics 
and Gynecology 




O. EDWIN OWEN, B.S., DAVID S. B. PENNOCK, 
M.A., D.O., Professor — D.O., M.D., D.Sc. (Ost), 

Chairman, Pathology F.A.C.O.S., Professor 

Emeritus, Surgery 



F. MUNRO PURSE, D.O., JOSEPH F. PY, D.O., JACOB B. RAPP, D.O., 

Associate Professor, M.Sc. (Ost), Professor — Associate, Osteopathic 

Pediatrics Chairman, Microbiology Medicine 
and Public Health 




BARBARA REDDING, D.O., Assistant Pro- 
fessor — Hospital Clerkship Supervisor, 
Osteopathic Principles and Techniques 

EARL F. RICEMAN, D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Pro- 
fessor, Osteopathic Medicine 

RAYMOND L. RUBERG, D.O., Associate, 
Surgery 



DOMINIC J. SALERNO, D.O., M.Sc. 
(OrthS), Instructor, Orthopedic Surgery 

LEOPOLD SALKIND, D.O., Staff, Pedi- 
atrics 



THOMAS F. SANTUCCI, D.O., Lecturer, 
Pediatrics 



JOHN H. SCHALL, JR., A.B., D.O., As- 
sistant Professor, Chemistry 



KENNETH L. SENIOR, B.S., M.S., D.Sc, 
Professor — Chairman, Chemistry 



JOHN W. SHEETZ, JR., D.O., M.Sc. (Ost), 
Associate Professor, Otorhinolaryngology 
and Bronchoesophagology 



TOBIAS SHILD, D.O., MORTON SILVER, A.B., 
M.Sc.(03t), Assistant M.A., D.O., Professional 

Professor, Pathology Teaching Supervisor, 




CHARLES W. SNYDER, 
JR., D.O., M.Sc.(Oto), 
Associate , Otorhino- 
laryngology 




1 


. 


i 




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C. HADDON SODEN, 
D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), Pro- 


WILLIAM S. 


SPAETH, 


fe 


ssor 


Emc 


■itiis, Osteo- 


D.O., 


F.A.C.O.P. 


Pro- 


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Prt 


uciples and 


fessor- 


—Chai 


man 


Pedi- 


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iqiies 




atrics 










HARRY I. STEIN, A.B., 
D.O., M.Sc.(Oto), As- 
sistant Professor, Otor- 
hinolaryngology and 
Neuro-Otolog \ 



HARTLEY R. STEIN- 
SNYDER, D.O., M.Sc. 
(UroS), Assistant, Urol- 
ogy 



H. WILLARD STER- THEODORE W. STIEG- CARLTON STREET, 

RETT, JR., D.O., yls- LER, JR., D.O., D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 

sociate, Urology f.A.C.O.l., Chairman, F.A.C.O.S., Clinical 

Clinics Professor, Surgery 






rS^ l^M 




WARREN H. SWENSON, D.O., Lecturer, 
Surgery 

A. ALINE SWIFT, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), Lec- 
turer, Kadiology 

GEORGE W. TAPPER, D.O., Associate, 
Osteopathic Medicine 



RALPH J. TOMEI, D.O., Associate, Osteo- 
pathic Medicine 



NICHOLAS D. TRETTA, B.S., D.O., Dem- 
onstrator, Student Health Physician, 
Osteopathic Principles and Techniques 

ENRIQUE G. VERGARA, A.B., D.O., Clin- 
ical Professor, Proctology 



LEO C. WAGNER, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), Pro- 
fessor, Pediatrics 



. CRAIG WALSH, D.O., F.A.C.O.A., Pro- 
fessor — Vice-Chairman, Anesthesiology 



SIDNEY M. WEITBERG, A.B , D.O., As- 
sistant, Osteopathic Medicine 



ROBERT A. WHINNEY, BERNARD W I T L I N , GOTTFRIED GEORGE NORMAN CASSETT, 

D.O., Associate, Acting A.B., M.S., D.Sc, BAUMGAERTAL, JR., A.B., D.O., Fellow,. 

Vice-Chairman, Urology F.A.A.A.S., F.A.P.H.A., B.S., D.O., Fellow, I«- Cardiovascular diseases 

Associate Professor te.rnal Medicine 




GALEN S. YOUNG, D.O., D.Sc, Clin- 
ical Professor, Surgery 



PAUL S. YOUNG, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
Clinical Assistant, Surgery 



QUENTIN R. FLICKINGER, D.O., 
Fellow, Radiology 



20 




Louis F. Amalfitano, B.S., 
D.O., Pediatrics 





Edward Prince Crowell, D.O., In- 
ternal Medicine, Acting Chief 
Resident 





Richard H. Borman, B.S.Ed., 
D.O., Orthopedic Surgery 




Roderick C. Cannatella, 
A.B., D.O., Pathology 



Richard Munro Couch, 
A.B., D.O., Second- 
Year Rotating Intern- 
ship 




Frank A. DeLuise, A.B., 
D.O., Radiology 



Charles Durrett Farrow, 
Jr., D.O., Second-Year 
Rotating Internship 




John J. Gilligan, A.: 
D.O., Radiology 




Edward M. Phillips, Jr., 
A.B., D.O., Internal 
Medicine 



1956 



Wynne A. Steinsnyder, 
A.B., D.O., Second- 
Year Rotating Intern- 
ship 




RESIDENTS 



Arnold Wechsler, D.O., 
Obstetrical - Gyneco- 
logical Surgery 



Aaron Zeldin, D.O., Ob- 
stetrical - Gynecologi- 
cal Surgery 



Not Pictured 
Joseph Philip Fresolone 

D.O., Surgery 
Francis Scott Wheeler, 

D.O., Anesthesiology 




NTERNES 



John Warrington Barnard 
A.B., D.O. 




1956 



Albert Grayce 
D.O. 






Robert Earl Hallinge 
B.S., D.O. 



John Christopher Bradford 
A.B., IL O. 





G. Richard Hartz 
D.O. 




Charles Lindbergh Carr 
A.B., D.O. 




Walter Arthur Fo 
B.S., D.O. 




George E. Henkel, Jr. 
B.S., D.O. 



Robert Willard Fatten 
A.B., D.O. 



Howard Stanley Lubin 
1 "^ \ If:. A.B., M.A., D.O. 



22 





Albert Linton Pearson, Jr 
A.B., D.O. 




j*=*^ 



Mary Elizabeth Tipton 
B.S., D.O. 



^ 




Edmund Sawyer Scott 
A.B., D.O. 





James Paul Soulges 
B.S., D.O. 



Cornelius Francis Sullivan 
A.B., D.O. 



Earle Noble Wagner 
A.B., D.O. 




Frank Adolph Wallington 
A.B., D.O. 




Edmund Lukens Zapp, Jr. 
B.S., D.O. 



Paul Hen-wood Thomas 
D.O. 




Michael J. Zappitelli 
A.B., D.O. 



23 



OFFICE 
IBRARY and STAFF 




C. Gloria Venn: 



Secretary to the Registra 



Jean Rosenberg, 

College Receptionist and Recordc 



Madeline C. Atkinson, 

Secretary to Bu 



iness Manager 



Refrain 




SENIOR 



FREDERICK J. JAEGER 

Treasurer 



^/ass Off kens 




JOHN P. POLULICH 2nd 
Honorary President 



26 



JOSEPH CARROL ANDREWS, D.O 



. . . from West Warwick, Rhode Island; 
who received his B.S. from Providence 
College; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity; member of Internal Medi- 
cine, Undergraduate Academy of Ap- 
plied Osteopathy and Linacre Societies, 
Glee Club and Student Council; to in- 
tern at Osteopathic General Hospital 
of Rhode Island and then to general 
practice in Rhode Island . . . 





and 



FRANK CHARLES BARONE, D.O 




. . . from Jamestown, New York; who 
attended the University of Toledo and 
received his B.A. from the University 
of Buffalo; served in the U. S. Navy; 
a member of Atlas fraternity. Student 
Council and Linacre Society; to intern 
at Northwest Hospital, Miami, Florida, 
and then to general practice . . . 



nd 



DONALD A. BAXTER, D.O 



. . . from Warren, Rhode Island; who at- 
tended Springfield College, served in the 
U. S. Navy; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity. President Internal Medicine So- 
ciety, member of Pediatrics, Obs.-Gyn, and 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy Societies; to intern at Osteopathic 
General Hospital of Rhode Island and then 
to general practice in Rhode Island . . . 





WILLIAM E. BETTS, JR., D.O. 



. . . from Pompton Lakes, New Jersey; 
who received his B.A. from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania; served in the 
U. S. Navy, presently in the active 
reserves; member of Sigma Chi and Phi 
Sigma Gamma fraternities; member of 
Internal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn. and 
Neuro-Psychiatric Societies; Class Vice- 
President, Chairman Christmas Seal 
Drive; to intern at Osteopathic Hos- 
pitals of Philadelphia and then to gen- 
eral practice . . . 




. . . from New Bedford, Massachusetts; 
who received his B.S. from Springfield 
College; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity; member of Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy, In- 
ternal Medicine, Pediatric and Obs.- 
Gyn. Societies; member of the Synapsis 
Staff and Osteopathic Day Committee; 
to intern at Massachusetts Osteopathic 
Hospital, and then to general practice 
in Boston . . . 



.nd 



R. WILLIAM BRADWAY, D.O 



. . . from Florence, New Jersey; who at- 
tended Mansfield State Teachers College; 
member of Sigma Zeta and Atlas fraternities; 
member of Obs.-Gyn., Internal Medicine and 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Osteop- 
athy Societies; member of the Axone and 
Synapsis staff. Osteopathic Day Committee; 
to intern at Detroit Osteopathic Hospital, 
and then to general practice in New Jer- 
sey . . . 



28 





JAMES J. BRESLIN, D.O 



I n d 



DAVID BRONSTEIN, D.O 



. . . from Ashland, Pennsylvania; who 
received his B.S. from Pennsylvania 
State University; member of Sigma 
Alpha Mu and Lambda Omicron 
Gamma fraternities; member of Pedi- 
atric, Internal Medicine, Neuro-Psychi- 
atric, Undergraduate Academy of Ap- 
plied Osteopathy and Obs.-Gyn. Socie- 
ties; Business Manager Synapsis; to in- 
tern at the Osteopathic Hospital of Har- 
risburg, and then to general practice in 
Pennsylvania . . . 



^ 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended LaSalle College; member 
of Phi Sigma Gamma fraternity; mem- 
ber of Pediatric, Internal Medicine and 
Obs.-Gyn. Societies; to intern at De- 
troit Osteopathic Hospital, and then to 
general practice . . . 




n d 



ROBERT W. CAPITAIN, D.O 





. . . from East Williston, New York; who 
received his B.A. from the University of 
Pennsylvania; member of Sigma Nu and 
Phi Sigma Gamma fraternities; to intern at 
Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, and 
then to general practice . . . 



29 



nd 



FRANK V. CARUSO, D 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Temple University and 
University of Pennsylvania, served in 
the U. S. Army; member of Iota Tau 
Sigma fraternity; to intern at West 
Side Osteopathic Hospital, York, Penna., 
and then to general practice . . . 





nd FRANK ANTHONY CERRA, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from LaSalle Col- 
lege; member of Iota Tau Sigma fra- 
ternity; Linacre Society, member of 
Axone and Synapsis Staff; to intern at 
Northwest Hospital, Miami, Florida, 
then to general practice in Miami, Flor- 
ida . . . 



nd JAMES CONSTANTINE CHIMERAKIS,D 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
received his B.A. at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, served in the U. S. Navy during 
World War II, President of Atlas fraternity, 
member of Internal Medicine and Obs.-Gyn. 
Societies, President Interfraternity Council 
and Senior Class President, Osteopathic Day 
Committee Chairman, Editor Axone and 
Editor-in-Chief 1956 Synapsis; to intern at 
Allcntown Osteopathic Hospital and then to 
general practice in Florida . . . 



30 




EUGENE COHEN, D.O. ... | 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from Temple Uni- 
versity; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma fraternity; to intern at Metro- 
politan Hospital, Philadelphia, and then 
to general practice . . . 




JEROME B. COHEN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended the University of Penn- 
sylvania; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma; a member of Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine, Neuro Psychiatry, Un- 
dergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy, Hillel and Obs.-Gyn.; to intern 
at Art Centre Hospital, Detroit, Michi- 
gan, then to general practice in the 
Philadelphia area . . . 




GERALD COTLER, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
attended Temple University; a member of 
Lambda Omicron Gamma fraternity, Neuro- 
Psychiatric and Hillel Societies; to intern at 
Metropolitan Hospital, Philadelphia, and 
then to specialty practice in Internal Medi- 
cine . . . 



I n d 



JOHN C. CRAWFORD, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his A.B. from LaSalle Col- 
lege and served in the U. S. Navy; a 
member of Atlas fraternity, Christian 
Osteopathic Society, Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy and 
Obs.-Gyn. Society; a member of the 
Synapsis and Axone Staff; to intern at 
the Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadel- 
phia and then to general practice . . . 





and JOHN ANTHONY D ' ALE S S AN D RO , D.O 




n 



? 



r 







. . . from Lackawanna, New York; who 
attended the University of Buffalo; a 
member of Atlas fraternity and Axone 
Staff; a member of Obs.-Gyn., Internal 
Medicine and Linacre Societies; to in- 
tern at Bay View Hospital, Bay Village, 
Ohio, and then to specialty practice in 
Obs.-Gyn. Surgery in Buffalo, New 
York . . . 



nd ALBERT FLOYD D'ALONZO, D.O. 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
attended Temple University, Villanova Uni- 
versity and received his B.A. from Duke Uni- 
versity; a member of Kappa Sigma and Atlas 
fraternities; Linacre, Internal Medicine and 
Obs.-Gyn. Societies; a member of Osteo- 
pathic Day Committee, Axone and Synapsis 
Staff; President Atlas fraternity. President 
Intcrfratcrnity Council, Class President 1; 
to intern at the Osteopathic Hospitals of 
'Philadelphia and then to general practice in 
Philadelphia . . . 



32 






and JOHN C. DEGHETTO, D.O. 



. . . from Saddlebrook, New Jersey; 
who attended Rutgers University and 
received his A.B. from Upsala College; 
a member of Atlas fraternity, Linacre 
and Obs.-Gyn. Societies; a member of 
Synapsis Staff; to intern at Bayview 
Hospital, Bay Village, Ohio, and then 
residency in Anesthesiology . . . 






and ROBERT GEORGE DE RUE, D 



. . . from Newark, New York; who at- 
tended New York State University, at 
Albany, New York, and received his 
B.A. from the University of Buffalo; 
a member of Thcta Chi and Atlas fra- 
ternities; member of Internal Medicine, 
Neuro-Psychiatric and Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy Socie- 
ties; Co-Editor of the Axone; to intern 
at Doctor's Hospital, Columbus, 
Ohio . . . 





DANTE DIMARZIO, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
attended LaSalle College and served in thj 
U. S. Army; to intern at Saginaw Osteo- 
pathic Hospital, Saginaw, Michigan, and 
then to general practice . . . 



33 



,nd 



ALVIN D. DUBIN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from Temple 
University; a member of Alpha Sigma 
Pi and Lambda Omicron Gamma fra- 
ternities; a member of Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn. and Hillel; 
to intern at the Osteopathic Hospitals 
of Philadelphia . . . 





ROBERT W. ENGLAND, D.O. 



. . . from Oaklyn, New Jersey; a clergy- 
man who attended Houghton College, 
A.B., Temple University Graduate 
School and Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary B.D.; President Christian Os- 
teopathic Society, member Internal Med- 
icine, Obs.-Gyn. and Neuro-Psychiatric 
Societies and Undergraduate Academy 
of Applied Osteopathy; a member of 
Visual Education Committee and Syn- 
apsis Staff; to intern at the Osteopathic 
Hospitals of Philadelphia and then a 
preaching physician wherever the Lord 
leads . . . 



n d 



ALAN M. FALLICK, 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
received his B.A. from Temple University; 
a member of Alpha Phi Omega and Lambda 
Omicron Gamma fraternities; a member 6i 
Neuro-Psychiatric, Obs.-Gyn. and Internal 
Medicine Societies; to intern at Metropolitan 
Hospital, Philadelphia . . . 



34 





F. JAY FRIEDLIN, D.O 



. . . from Pitman, New Jersey; who 
attended the University of Pennsylvania 
and received his B.S. from Ursinus Col- 
lege; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity; Societies of Internal Medi- 
cine and Obs.-Gyn.; to intern at the Os- 
teopathic Hospitals of Philadelphia and 
then to general practice in Pitman, New 
Jersey . . . 



nd E. MILTON FRIEDMAN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended St. Joseph's College and 
received his A.B. from the University 
of Pennsylvania; served in the U. S. 
Army; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma fraternity, Internal Medicine 
and Obs.-Gyn. Societies; to intern at 
Metropolitan Hospital, Philadelphia, and 
then to general practice in Philadel- 
phia . . . 





nd 



ROBINSON G. FRY, D.O 





. . . from Orefield, Pennsylvania; who at- 
tended Ursinus College and Muhlenberg 
College; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity; Internal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn. and 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy Societies; to intern at Allentown 
Osteopathic Hospital, and then to general 
practice in Allentown . . . 



35 



and JULIUS RUSSELL GLOVER, D.O. 



. . . from Passaic, New Jersey; who 
received his B.S. from Howard Univer- 
sity; a member of Omega Psi Phi and 
Lambda Omicron Gamma fraternities; 
a member of the Internal Medicine and 
Obs.-Gyn. Societies; to intern at Bay 
View Hospital, Bay Village, Ohio, and 
then to general practice in Passaic, New 
Jersey . . . 



^s^ 



Wy 





ALBERT GOLIN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his A.B. from Temple 
University, attended Still College of Os- 
teopathy, Des Moines, Iowa, and served 
in the U. S. Air Force; a member of 
Lambda Omicron Gamma fraternity; 
Societies of Internal Medicine, Obs.- 
Gyn., Neuro-Psychiatry and Associate 
Editor Axone and Synapsis; to intern at 
Metropolitan Hospital, Philadelphia, and 
then to general practice in the Phila- 
delphia area . . . 



nd DONALD D. GREIF, D.O 



. . . from Brooklyn, New York; who at- 
tended Brooklyn College; a member of 
Lambda Omicron Gamma fraternity, Obs.- 
Gyn. and Hillel Societies; to intern at May- 
wood Hospital, Maywood, California, and 
then to general practice in Southern Cali- 
fornia . . . 



36 





THOMAS B. GRIFFITH, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Peniisylv.ini.i; 
who attended Nebraska State College, 
University of Omaha and the University 
of Colorado; a member of Phi Sigma 
Gamma fraternity; to intern at Allen- 
town Osteopathic Hospital, and then 
to general practice in Pennsylvania . . . 



n'1'^5 



nd 



FREDERICK GROSSBART, D.O 



. . . from Newark, New Jersey; who 
received his B.S. from Seton Hall Uni- 
versity; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma fraternity. Internal Medicine, 
Pediatric, Obs.-Gyn. and Hillel Societies; 
to intern at Bay View Hospital, Bay 
Village, Ohio, and then to specialty 
practice in Internal Medicine in New 
Jersey . . . 






EUGENE R. HEAGEN, D.O 



. . . from Woodhaven, New York City; who 
attended New York University, Hunter 
College and served in the U. S. Army; a 
member of Phi Sigma Gamma fraternity. 
Internal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn. and Linacre 
Societies; to intern at Detroit Osteopathic 
Hospital . . . 



37 



nd WILLIAM ROWLAND HEMSLEY, JR., D .O 



. . . from Audubon, New Jersey; who 
received his B.S. from Frankhn and 
Marshall College; a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha fraternity; Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn., Under- 
graduate Academy of Applied Osteopa- 
thy, Christian Osteopathic, and a mem- 
ber of the Osteopathic Day Committee; 
to intern at Doctors' Hospital, Los 
Angeles, California, and then to general 
practice . . . 






iS^^ 



nd 



JOHN A. HIPPLE, D.p 




'1-. 



-a' 



. . . from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Harrisburg Area College 
and received his A.B. from Gettysburg 
College; served in the U. S. Army; a 
member of Obs.-Gyn. Society; to in- 
tern at Detroit Osteopathic Hospital, 
and then to general practice . . . 



and SAMSON A. INWALD, D.O 



. . . from Brooklyn, New York; who re- 
ceived his B.S. from Brooklyn College; a 
member of Lambda Omicron Gamma fra- 
ternity, Societies of Obs.-Gyn. and Pediatrics, 
Chairman Hillcl Society, Axone and Synapsis 
Staff; to intern at Art Centre Osteopathic 
Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, and then to 
general practice in Northeast U. S. . . . 



38 






RODNEY TRYGVE JACOBSEN, D.O 



. . . from Camden, New Jersey; who 
attended the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, received his A.B. from Rutgers 
University and served in the U. S. Navy; 
a member of Phi Sigma Gamma fratern- 
ity. Internal Medicine and Ob>s.-Gyn. 
Societies; to intern at Biscayne Osteo- 
pathic Hospital, Miami, Florida, and 
then to general practice in Florida . . . 



nd FREDERICK JOSEPH JAEGER, II 



. . . from Buffalo, New York; who at- 
tended the University of Buffalo and 
Shurtleff College, Alton, Illinois; a 
member of Atlas fraternity. Societies of 
Neuro-Psychiatric, Obs.-Gyn. and Un- 
dergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy; Student Council, Class Treas- 
urer and active in PCO TV produc- 
tions; to intern at Doctors' Hospital, 
Columbus, Ohio . . . 





JAY HARRIS JOSEPH, D.O 



. . . from Vineland, New Jersey; who at- 
tended the University of North Carolina 
A.B., and Temple University M.Ed.; a mem- 
ber of Pi Lambda Phi, Alpha Epsilon Delta, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Order of the Old Well 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma (President); 
Societies of Pediatrics, Obs.-Gyn., Neuro- 
Psjchiatric and Flillel, Vice-President Class 
3 and Student Council, Interfraternity 
Council, PCO Basketball Team; to intern 
at Metropolitan Hospital, Philadelphia, and 
then to specialty practice in Pediatrics . . . 



39 



DAVID A. KELLAM, D.O 



. . . from Binghamton, New York; who 
attended Colgate University and Syra- 
cuse University; a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega and Phi Sigma Gamma fra- 
ternities; Societies of Obs.-Gyn. and 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied 
Osteopathy; to intern at Detroit Oste- 
opathic Hospital, and then to specialty 
practice in Internal Medicine . . . 




DONALD W. KETNER, D.O 



. . . from Clarion, Pennsylvania; who 
attended Grove City College and served 
in the U. S. Army; a member of Sigma 
Tau Gamma and Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternities; Societies of Obs.-Gyn. 
(President), Pediatrics and Internal 
Medicine; to intern at the Detroit Oste- 
opathic Hospital . . . 



and 



CARL KODROFF, D.O 



( 




. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
received his A.B. from Temple University; 
a member of Lambda Omicron Gamma fra- 
ternity, Vice-President Pediatric Society, a 
member of Obs.-Gyn. and Internal Medi- 
cine Societies, Student Council and PCO 
Basketball team; to intern at Osteopathic 
Hospitals of Philadelphia, and then to general 
practice in Philadelphia . . . 





. \ 



/ 



40 



^n^l|^^« 





and 



CHARLES H. KROH, D.O 



'*^^/' '"^Si^Ji 




. . . from Clarion, Pennsylvania; at- 
tended Grove City College and received 
his B.S. in Education at Clarion State 
Teachers College, served in the U. S. 
Army and Air Force; a member of Pi 
Gamma Mn, Alpha Psi Omega and Phi 
Sigma Gamma (president) fraternities, 
secretary, Intcrfraternity Council, to 
iniern at Allentown Osteopathic Hos- 
pital, and then to general practice . . . 



. n d 



RICHARD S. LATTA, D 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, served in the 
U. S. Navy; a member of Atlas fra- 
ternity; to intern at Lancaster Osteo- 
pathic Hospital, and then to general 
practice in Lancaster . . . 





BERNARD JOHN L E T O U R N E A U , D.O 



. . . from Bethpage, Long Island, New York; 
who received his B.S. from Long Lsland Uni- 
versity and served in the U. S. Army; a 
member of Atlas fraternity; Linacre Society 
and Undergraduate Academy of Applied 
Osteopathy; to intern at Northwest Hos- 
pital, Miami, Florida, and then to general 
practice in Florida . . . 



nd 



JACK LEVITT, D 



. . . from Philadelphi.i, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Kentucky University; a 
member of Lambda Omicron Gamma 
fraternity, Obs.-Gyn., and Neuro-Psy- 
chiatric Societies; to intern at Lancaster 
Osteopathic Hospital, and then to gen- 
eral practice in Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania . . . 





HENRY S. LIEBERT, JR., D.O 



. . . from Richmond, Virginia; who re- 
ceived his B.S. from Hampden Sydney; 
a member of Kappa Sigma and Phi 
Sigma Gamma fraternities; a member 
of Obs.-Gyn., Internal Medicine and 
Pediatric Societies; to intern at the Os- 
teopathic Hospitals of Philadelphia and 
then to general practice in Richmond, 
Virginia . . . 



nd ARTHUR AUGUSTINE LODATO, D.O 



. . . from Bristol, Pennsylvania; who re- 
ceived his B.S. and A.B. from Florida South- 
ern College; a member of Tau Epsilon Phi 
and Phi Sigma Gamma fraternities; a mem- 
ber of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatric, Internal Medi- 
cine and Linacre Societies; to intern at Bis- 
cayne Osteopathic Hospital and then to gen- 
eral practice in Fort Lauderdale, Florida . . . 



rw 



42 



^ 





JOHN EDWARD LOVE, D.O 



. . . from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; who 
attended University of Pittsburgh; a 
member of Sigma Pi and Phi Sigma 
Gamma fraternities, a member of the 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Os- 
teopathy, Societies of Internal Medicine 
and Obs.-Gyn.; to intern at Lancaster 
Osteopathic Hospital and then to gen- 
eral practice in Virginia . . , 



nd RALPH A. LUONGO, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.S. from Villanova 
University and served in the U. S. 
Army; a member of Lambda Kappa 
Delta and Iota Tau Sigma fraternities; 
a member of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatric, Un- 
dergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy and Linacre Societies; President 
of Iota Tau Sigma and a member of 
Interfraternity Council; to intern at 
Detroit Osteopathic Hospital and then 
to general practice in the Philadelphia 
area . . . 





JOSEPH EARLE MAKANT, JR., D.O. 



. . . from Pawtucket, Rhode Island; who 
attended Colby College and received his A.B. 
from the University of Rhode Island; a 
member of Delta Upsilon and Phi Sigma 
Gamma fraternities; Internal Medicine, 
Obs.-Gyn., Undergraduate Academy of Ap- 
plied Osteopathy and Pediatric Societies and 
a member of the Synapsis Staff; to intern at 
Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital and 
then to general practice . . . 



43 



and NICK A. MARINO, 



. . . from Cleveland, Ohio; who received 
his B.A. from Miami University, Ohio; 
a member of Thcta Chi and Phi Sigma 
Gamma fraternities, a member of Pedi- 
atric, Obs.-Gyn., Undergraduate Acad- 
emy of Applied Osteopathy Societies 
and Synapsis Staff; to intern at Grand- 
view Osteopathic Hospital and then to 
general practice in Cleveland, Ohio . . . 





nd CHARLES NICHOLAS MARRA, D.O 



. . . from Tuckahoe, New York; who 
received his B.S. from Michigan State 
University and served in the U. S. Navy; 
a member of Iota Tau Sigma fraternity; 
a member of Linacre Society, Under- 
graduate Academy of Applied Osteop- 
ath)-, Pediatric, and Obs.-Gyn. Socie- 
ties; to intern at Farrow Osteopathic 
Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania, and then 
to general practice in Bronxville, New 
York 



and 



LEO MICHAEL MARTSUKIS, D.O 



. . . from New York; who attended Villa- 
nova University and received his A.B. from 
New York University; a member of Atlas 
fraternity; to intern at Doctors Hospital, 
Los Angeles, California, and then to specialty 
practice . . . 



44 





MURRAY NORMAN MATEZ, D.O. ... 1 



. . . from Atlantic City, New Jersey; 
who received his B.S. from the Univer- 
sity of Georgia and served in the U. S. 
Navy; a member of Tau Epsilon Phi 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma fraterni- 
ties; a member of the Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine, Obs.-Gyn. and Hillel; 
a member of the Synapsis Staff; to 
intern at Metropolitan Hospital, Phila- 
delphia, and then to general practice . . . 



nd ROBERT L. MEALS, D.O 



. . . from Lebanon, Pennsylvania; at- 
tended Huntington College and re- 
ceived his B.S. from Lebanon Valley 
College; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity. Societies of Obs.-Gyn., In- 
ternal Medicine, Pediatrics, Neuro-Psy- 
chiatry and Undergraduate Ac.idcmy of 
Applied Osteopathy; to intern at the 
Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadelphia, 
and then to general practice in Pennsyl- 
vania . . . 





FREDERICK R. MELHORN, D.O 



. . . from Johnstown, Penns)'lvania; who 
received his B.A. from Gettysburg College; 
a member of the Alpha Tau Omega and Phi 
Sigma Gamma fraternities. Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine, Neuro-Psychiatry and the 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy; and a member of the Basketball 
team; to intern at the Osteopathic Hospitals 
of Philadelphia and then to general prac- 



45 



and MILTON METZMAN, D.O 



. . . from Phihidelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Temple University and 
received his B.S. from the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy and Science; a 
member of Lambda Omicron Gamma 
fraternity, Society of Internal Medicine 
and Neuro-Psychiatric Society; to in- 
tern at the Osteopathic Hospitals of 
Philadelphia and then to general prac- 
tice . . . 






LESTER C. MILLARD, D.O. 



. . . from Gouverneur, New York; who 
received his B.A. from St. Lawrence 
University and served in the U. S. 
Army; a member of Phi Sigma Gamma 
fraternity, Sophomore Class President; 
to intern at Massachusetts Osteopathic 
Hospital and then to general practice in 
New York ... 



nd 



JAMES J. MINAHAN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
received his B.S. from Villanova University 
and served in the U. S. Army Air Corps; 
to intern at Waterville Osteopathic Hos- 
pital, Maine, and then to general practice 
in Pennsylvania or Texas . . . 



46 





EDWARD JOHN MINEHAN, D.O 



. . . from Wilmington, Delaware; who 
received his A.B. from the University of 
Delaware; a member of Sigma Nu and 
Phi Sigma Gamma fraternities; a mem- 
ber of the Societies of Internal Medicine, 
Vice-President Obs.-Gyn., Pediatrics, 
Linacre Society and the Synapsis Staff; 
to intern at Massachusetts Osteopathic 
Hospital and then to general practice in 
Delaware . . . 



and JACK ANTHONY MINUTELLA, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from LaSalle Col- 
lege; to intern at Art Centre Hospital, 
Detroit, Michigan, and then to general 
practice in Philadelphia . . . 



-1^« 



i^^ 



y.fA 





LOIS J. GEHRIS MOLL, D.O 



. . . from Reading, Pennsylvania; who re- 
ceived her B.S. from Albright College; a 
member of Pi Alpha Tau and Phi Delta 
Sigma sororities; a member of Pediatric and 
Obs.-Gyn. Societies; Class Secretary; to in- 
tern at the Osteopathic Hospitals of Phila- 
delphia and then to general practice in Bev- 
erly Hills, California . . . 



47 



THOMAS LOUIE MOY, D.O. 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from LaSalle Col- 
lege; a member of Atlas fraternity, 
Class Secretary, served on the Osteo- 
pathic Day Committee, member of the 
Axone and Synapsis Staff; to intern at 
the Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadel- 
phia and then to general practice in 
Phliadelphia . . . 





STANLEY ORONS, D.O 



. . . from New York City, New York; 
who received his B.S. from Purdue Uni- 
versity; a member of Tau Epsilon Phi 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma, Socie- 
ties of Internal Medicine and Neuro- 
psychiatry; to intern at Metropolitan 
Hospital, Philadelphia, and then to gen- 
eral practice in New York . . . 



ar DAVID ASHLEY PATRIQUIN 



. . . from Providence, Rhode Island; who 
received his B.S. from Tufts College, served 
in the USMC; a member of Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity. Societies of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatric 
and Undergraduate Academy of Applied Os- 
teopathy; a member of Student Council; to 
intern at the Osteopathic Hospital of Maine 
and then to general practice in Maine . . . 



48 





HOWARD C. B. PECKINS, D.O 



and SEYMOUR PIWOZ, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended the University of Penn- 
sylvania; a member of Tau Delta Phi 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma fraterni- 
ties; Neuro-Psychiatry Society Presi- 
dent, Obs.-Gyn. and Hillcl; to intern 
at Metropolitan Hospital and then to' 
general practice . . . 




. . . from Utica, New York; who at- 
tended Syracuse University and re- 
ceived his B.A. from Middlebury Col- 
lege; served in the U. S. Army; a 
member of Atlas fraternity; a member 
of Obs.-Gyn. and Undergraduate Acad- 
emy of Applied Osteopathy Societies 
and the Synapsis Staff; to intern at Flint 
General Hospital . . . 





JOHN PETER POLULICH, II, D.O 



. . . from Grant wood. New Jersey; who 
received his B.S. from St. John's College of 
Arts and Sciences and attended St. Johns 
University-Graduate School; a member of 
Delta Sigma Pi and Iota Tau Sigma Fratern- 
ities, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Obs.- 
Gyn., Linacre Societies, Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy, Axone and 
Synapsis Staff, Junior Class President; to 
intern at MetropoUtan Hospital and then to 
Bariatrics and general practice in Jersey 
City, New Jersey ... 



49 



and THOMAS FRANCIS A. POWELL, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his A.B. from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania; served in U. S. 
Air Force; a member of Kappa Alpha 
Psi fraternity; a member of Obs.-Gyn. 
and Linacre Societies, served on Student 
Council; to intern at Metropolitan Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, and then to general 
practice . . . 





CHARLES PLATT PRITCHARD, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.S. from Ursinus Col- 
lege; a member of Beta Sigma Lambda 
and Phi Sigma Gamma fraternities; a 
member of the Societies of Obs.-Gyn., 
Pediatrics, Internal Medicine and the 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Os- 
teopathy; member of Student Council, 
Secretary 2, Glee Club President and 
Synapsis Staff; to intern at Massachu- 
setts Osteopathic Hospital and then to 
general practice . . . 



JOSEPH J. PRYKANOSKI, D.O 



. . . from Trenton, New Jersey; who at- 
tended Temple University and served in the 
Air Force; a member of Alpha Sigma Phi, 
Honorary Biology Society; to intern at the 
Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadelphia and 
then to general practice in New Jersey . . . 



50 






WELLDEN PYLE, JR., D.O. 






. . . from South Orange, New Jersey; 
who attended the University of Ver- 
mont and received his A.B. from Laf- 
ayette College; served in the U. S. 
Navy; a member of Sigma Phi and Phi 
Sigma Gamma fraternities, also a mem- 
ber of the Pediatric Society and the 
Synapsis Staff; to intern at the West 
Side Osteopathic Hospital, York, Penn- 
sylvania, and then to general practice in 
York . . . 



I n d 



WALTER T. ROBINSON, JR., D 



. . . from Flourtown, Pennsylvania; re- 
ceived his A.B. from Temple Univer- 
sity; a member of the Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy, Pedi- 
atric and Obs.-Gyn. Societies; to intern 
at Detroit Osteopathic Hospital and 
then to a residency in Surgery or Obs.- 
Gyn. . . . 





WILLIAM D. RUSIN, D.O 



. . . from Camden, New Jersey; who received 
his B.S. from St. Joseph's College; a member 
of Atlas fraternity. Internal Medicine, 
Neuro-Psychiatric and Linacre Societies; to 
intern at Glendale Community Hospital, 
California . . . 



and S. PAUL SADICK, D 



. . . from Salisbury, Maryland; who re- 
cieved his B.S. from Washington Col- 
lege; a member of Sigma Alpha Mu and 
Lambda Omicron Gamma fraternities; 
Societies of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatrics and 
Internal Medicine; Axone and Synapsis 
Staff; to intern at Detroit Osteopathic 
Hospital and then to EENT surgery . . . 






HENRY SALKIND, D.O 



. . . from New York City, New York; 
who received his B.S. from Moravian 
College and served in the U. S. Army; 
a member of Omicron Gamma Omega 
and Lambda Omicron Gamma faterni- 
tics; .1 member of the Societies of In- 
ternal Medicine and Obs.-Gyn.; mem- 
ber of Student Council; to intern at the 
Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadelphia 
and then to the Bah.imas, Nassau, 
B. W. I. . . . 



nd RALPH SCHWARTZ, D.O 



. . . from Bridgeton, New Jersey; who re- 
ceived his B.S. from Dickinson College; a 
member of Phi Epsilon Pi and Lambda Omi- 
cron Gamma fraternities; a member of Obs.- 
Gyn., Neuro-Psychiatric Societies and the 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied Oste- 
opathy; a member of the Axone and Syn- 
apsis Staff and Osteopathic Day Committee; 
to intern at Lancaster Osteopathic Hospital 
and then to Obs.-Gyn. in Lancaster . . . 



52 





GEORGE BARINGER SLIFER, JR., D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Temple University; a 
member of Phi Sigma Gamma fratern- 
ity; Obs.-Gyn. Society and President 
Student Council; to intern at the Osteo- 
pathic Hospitals of Philadelphia and 
then to general practice . . . 



and IRVIN S. SMITH, D.O 



. . . from Atlantic City, New Jersey; 
who received his A.B. at Temple Uni- 
versity and served in U. S. Air Force; 
a member of Lambda Omicron Gamma 
fraternity; Internal Medicine and Hillel 
Societies; to intern at Metropolitan Hos- 
pital and then to general practice . . . 





and PAUL STEPHEN SNOKE, D.O 



. . . from Lemoyne, Pennsylvania; who re- 
ceived his B.S. from Dickinson College, 
served in the U. S. Navy; a member of Phi 
Delta Theta and Phi Sigma Gamma fratern- 
ities; Obs.-Gyn., Pediatric and Undergradu- 
ate Academy of Applied Osteopathy Socie- 
ties; Synapsis Staff and Coach of Nurses 
Basketball team; to intern at the Osteo- 
pathic Hospitals of Philadelphia and then to 
speciahze in Anesthesiology . . . 



53 



nd 



RICHARD K. SNYDER. D.O. 



''^i 

•^^^P^^ ^ 



. . . from Allentown, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Muhlenberg College; a 
member of Phi Sigma Gamma fratern- 
ity, Societies of Obs.-Gyn., President of 
Pediatrics, Undergraduate Academy of 
Applied Osteopathy, a member of Stu- 
dent Council; to intern at Allentown 
Osteopathic Hospital and then to gen- 
eral practice in Allentown . . . 




STEIN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.S. from Ursinus Col- 
lege; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma fraternity, Neuro-Psychiatric 
and Hillel Societies; to intern at Metro- 
politan Hospital and then to general 
practice in Philadelphia . . . 



, n d 



JAMES J. SULLIVAN, D.O 



. . . from Springfield, Massachusetts; who re- 
ceived his B.S. from Mount St. Mary's Col- 
lege, a member of Phi Sigma Gamma fra- 
ternity; a member of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatrics 
and the Undergraduate Academy of Applied 
Osteopathy; Osteopathic Day Committee 
and Linacre Societies; to intern at Flint Gen- 
eral, Flint, Michigan, and then to general 
practice in Washington State . . . 



54 





EDWARD S. SWIATKOWSKI, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.S. from St. Joseph's 
College and served in the U. S. Navy; 
a member of Atlas fraternity; Neuro- 
Psychiatric and Internal Medicine So- 
cieties; to intern at the Osteopathic 
Hospitals of Philadelphia, and then to 
general practice in Philadelphia . . . 



: n d 



BARRY DONALD WALP, D 



,. . . from Forty Fort, Pennsylvania; 
(who received his B.S. from Franklin 
' and Marshall College; a member of Phi 
Kappa Psi and Atlas fraternities; a mem- 
ber of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatrics and Un- 
dergraduate Academy of Applied Os- 
teopathy Societies; Axone and Synapsis 
Staff; to intern at Lancaster Osteo- 
pathic Hospital and then to general 
practice or specialty practice in Obs.- 
Gyn. in Lancaster, Pennsylvania . . . 





nd 



HERBERT WIENER, D.O 



M H I 




. . . from Brooklyn, New York; who re- 
ceived his A.B. from Brooklyn College; a 
member of Epsilon Phi Alpha and Lambda 
Omicron Gamma fraternities; a member of 
the Societies of Obs.-Gyn., Pediatrics, In- 
ternal Medicine and Neuro-Psychiatry; As- 
sociate Editor Axone; to intern at Metro- 
politan Hospital, Philadelphia, and then to 
general practice . . . 



55 



nd J. J. WILDMANN, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his A. A. from Montgom- 
ery Jr. College and B.S. from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland; served in the U. S. 
Army; a member of Phi Kappa Tau, 
Sigma Alpha Omicron and Lambda 
Omicron Gamma fraternities; Synapsis 
Staff and Osteopathic Day Committee; 
Obs.-Gyn., Internal Medicine, Pediatrics 
and Undergraduate Academy of Applied 
Osteopathy Societies; to intern at May- 
wood Hospital, California, and then to 
general practice in California . . . 





and LEONARD V. WORTH, JR., D.O 



. . . from Williams ville, New York; 
who received his A.B. from the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo; a member of Alpha 
Phi Omega and Atlas fraternities; a 
member of Linacre Society and the 
Undergraduate Academy of Applied 
Osteopathy; Glee Club Accompanist; 
to intern at Osteopathic Hospital of 
Maine and then to general practice . . . 



and J. BRENDAN WYNNE, JR., D.O 



. . . from East Greenwich, Rhode Island; 
who attended Merrimack - College and re- 
ceived his A.B. from Providence College; 
President of Phi Sigma Gamma fraternity; 
a member of Pediatric, Obs.-Gyn., Under- 
i graduate Academy of Applied Osteopathy 
and Linacre Societies; Osteopathic Day Com- 
mittee and Interfraternity Council; to in- 
tern at the Osteopathic General Hospital of 
Rhode Island and then to general practice in 
Rhode Island . . . 



56 






ALEXANDER D. XENAKIS, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who received his B.A. from Temple Uni- 
versity, served in the USMC; a mem- 
ber of Phi Sigma Gamma fraternity; 
Obs.-Gyn., Internal Medicine, and Pedi- 
atric Societies; College Photographer, 
Axone and Synapsis Staff; to intern at 
the Osteopathic Hospitals of Philadel- 
phia and then to general practice in 
Philadelphia . . . 



nd! WARREN C. YOUNG 



. . . from Franklin, Ohio; who attended 
Miami University, Ohio; a member of 
Phi Sigma Gamma fraternity; Obs.- 
Gyn., Pediatrics and the Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy Socie- 
ties; to intern at Grandview Osteopathic 
Hospital, and then to general practice 
in Ohio . . . 





JOSEPH YURKANIN, D.O 



. . . from Ashley, Pennsylvania; who at- 
tended Temple University and received his 
B.S. from the University of Scranton; served 
in the U. S. Navy; a member of Iota Tau 
Sigma fraternity; Linacre, Pediatrics, Obs.- 
Gyn. and Internal Medicine Societies; to in- 
tern at Grandview Osteopathic Hospital, 
and then to general practice in Ohio . . . 



57 



FRANK F. ZACCARDI, D.O 



. . . from East Orange, New Jersey; 
who received his B.A. from Upsala Col- 
lege; a member of Iota Tau Sigma fra- 
ternity; Societies of Obs.-Gyn., Internal 
Medicine, Linacre and Undergraduate 
Academy of Applied Osteopathy; to 
intern at the Osteopathic Hospitals of 
Philadelphia and then to general prac- 
tice in New Jersey . . . 




. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended the University of Penn- 
sylvania and served in the U. S. Army; 
a member of Lambda Omicron Gamma 
fraternity, Hillel Society; to intern at 
the Osteopathic Hospital of Harrisburg 
and then to general practice . . . 



nd MICHAEL WILLIAM ZARRILLI, D.O 






1 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; who 
received his A.B. from LaSalle College; a 
member of Iota Tau Sigma fraternity; Lin- 
acre Society; to intern at Monte Sano Os- 
teopathic Hospital in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, and then to general practice . . . 



58 




and ABRAHAM ZELLIS, D.O 



. . . from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
who attended Rittenhouse Area College 
and received his A.B. from Temple Uni- 
versity; a member of Lambda Omicron 
Gamma; Obs.-Gyn. Society; Vice-Presi- 
dent Senior Class; to intern at the Flint 
General Hospital, Michigan, and then 
to general practice . . . 




'56' GRADUATES 




c 

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S 



HOSPITAL SERVICES 




DEPARTMENTS of 

SURGERY and 
ANESTHESIOLOGY 



JAMES MADISON EATON, D.O., F.A.C.O.S. 

Chief Attending Surgeon 



General Surgery, Orthopedics, Proctology, Urology, and Anesthesiology are con- 
sidered integral parts of the Department of Surgery. In the first year minor surgery is 
thoroughly covered. The student is schooled in the principles of asepsis, antisepsis, 
sterilization, dressings, sutures, ligatures, the operating room technique and instruments 
used in Surgery. 

The second year course comprises a series of lectures and demonstrations on surgical 
trauma and infections. The study of the fundamental principles of anesthesia, asepsis, the 
control of hemorrhage, operative indications, post operative care, surgical technique, 
and methods of operation gives the student an intelligent grasp of the purpose and 
design of operative procedure. The traumatic surgery course is continued through the 
third year. In addition a course in anesthesiology is presented covering the methods of 
producing anesthesia, the selection of an anesthetic and methods of administration. The 
third year is replete with many other surgical courses. The general surgery course deals 
with regional surgery and is complemented by the Cadaveric surgery course in the 
dissecting room. 

The Proctology course reviews the anatomy and physiology of the rectum. The 
etiology, pathology and treatment of the various rectal diseases are considered. Three 
Urology courses are presented covering the subject in great detail. 

Fourth year students observe and often assist in operations at both 48th St. 
and North Center. Here the techniques of Anesthesiology are seen first hand. Histories 
and physicals are accomplished by senior students and post operative care is noted, 
observed and very often actively engaged in by the senior student. 





V-' 




ADIOLOGY 




In the field of Radiology the first year is spent in learning the funda- 
mentals of radio physics and radio biology. To this is added the teaching of 
roentgen rays, radium and radio isotopes as they pertain to the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease and the allied fields of research and investigation. 

Physiology is the main item of teaching during the second year. The 
students meet at one of the three fluoroscopic stations of the Department of 
Radiology and examine the heart, lungs, and gastro-intestinal systems. 

In the third year the student studies Pathology as revealed by the 
roentgen ray. This is accomplished by the viewing of film transparencies and 
lantern slides. It is by this system that the student familiarizes himself with 
the pathologic phenomena associated with traumatic, metabolic, inflammatory 
and neoplastic conditions, together with the development and degenerative 
states affecting the various systems of the body. 

The fourth year student is offered the opportunity to actively participate 
in conferences set up by the Department of Radiology, the clinics of the 
College as well as conferences and discussions with the staff of the hospital. 



PAUL T. LLOYD, D.O. 

M.Sc.(Ost), D.Sc, F.A.C.O.S. 

Chief Attending Radiologist 



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BSTETRICS and 



G 



YNECOLOGY 



During the latter part of the second year and throughout the third year 
demonstrations and chnical teachings are given in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
These courses cover in orderly manner a review of anatomy and physiology as 
they pertain to obstetrics and gynecology. Normal and abnormal obstetrics are 
covered and the didactic work is supplemented by clinical demonstrations, 
manikin work, slides, movies and individual instruction. In gynecology the 
students are given lectures and cUnical conferences covering gynecology in all 
its phases. This is supplimented by operative clinics, slides, movies, etc. 

During the fourth year students are assigned at various times for designated 
periods to services in the out-patient clinics and in the hospitals. In this time 
they observe obstetrical patients throughout all phases of pregnancy, follow 
patients through labor to delivery and the puerperium. Under direct supervision 
of the attending staff opportunity is given the student to assist in the deliveries 
of normal cases in the hospitals. 

Students are assigned to cover all gynecological ward patients in the 
hospitals. They take histories, examine the patients and observe or assist at 
operations and follow the progress of the patients until discharged. 

In the out-patient department each student attends a number of obstetrical 
patients and cares for the patient throughout the course of her pregnancy 
until she is delivered. Gynecological patients seen in the cHnic are examined 
and treated under the care of the senior student with supervision of the teach- 
mg staff. During the fourth year frequent conferences are held at which time 
pathological cases are discussed. 




FRANK E. GRUBER, D.O. 

Chief Attending Physician 




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PRETTY SOON NOW 




12 HOURS LATER 





SEE YOU IN 9 MONTHS 



67 







EDIATRICS 




WILLIAM S. SPAETH, D.O., F.A.C.O.P. 
Director, Consulting Physician 




The required work in Pediatrics consists of didactic lectures, clinics, section instruc- 
tion, and case presentations. In the second year the anatomy, physiology, and develop- 
ment of the child are stressed. Careful consideration is given to the physical examination, 
hygiene, and feeding in childhood. A course in infectious diseases is also offered in the 
second year which covers the etiology, symptomatology, and diagnosis of the more 
common diseases. 

In the third year there is a systemic approach utilized in the presentation of three 
courses. The first course deals with the general diagnosis, symptomatology and treat- 
ment of the gastro-intestinal diseases peculiar to childhood and infancy. In the second 
course lectures are given on diseases of the respiratory system covering the etiology, 
diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases peculiar to. childhood. The third course 
consists of lectures on congenital heart disease and genito-urinary disease. 

The last year is divided between hospital and clinic training. In the hospital senior 
students take case histories, do physical examinations, and may follow the hospital 
management of pediatric problems. In the clinic patients are assigned to a student who 
takes a complete history and does a thorough physical examination. The findings are 
reviewed by the staff supervisor and diagnosis and treatment are discussed. If consulta- 
tions with other departments are deemed necessary the students are encouraged to attend 
the consultation and discuss the recommendations. 

In addition to case conferences regularly held in the clinic, a short course in con- 
tagious diseases is given at Philadelphia Hospital for Contagious Diseases, where enlight- 
ening ward walks round out the students' education. 



# 




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NTERNAL 



Med 



ICINE 




WILLIAM F. DAIBER, D.O., F.A.C.O.I. 

Professor — Chairman 

The history of the Department of Osteopathic Medicine as an 

organized department dates back to 1918. During this year Dr. C. 

Paul Snyder was Professor of Cardio-respiratory Diseases and also 

taught physical diagnosis. In the early nineteen twenties Dr. Snyder 

became interested in otorhinolaryngology. He developed an interest 

in and sponsored the lite Ralph Fischer who in 1924 assumed the 

leadership in the Department of Osteopathic Medicine. Under Dr. 

Fischer who served as chairman from 1924 until 1951 the department 

experienced its greatest development. Under his sponsorship and train- 
ing, eight men in the department became certified in Osteopathic 

Medicine by the American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine. 

There are now 28 members in the department who supply 462 
platform lecture hours yearly in the sixteen courses in Osteopathic 
Medicine. In addition the special clinics in Allergy, Rheumatic dis- 
eases, Hematology, Endocrine diseases, Gastro-Intestinal diseases and 
Cardiovascular diseases are conducted under the leadership of the senior 
members of the department. 

The teaching of cardiovascular diseases has been greatly aug- 
mented by a teaching grant from the National Heart Institute. This 
has resulted in an additional 1600 teaching hours in cardiovascular 
diseases yearly, given by 10 members of the department. Additional 
valuable equipment has been purchased with grant funds. An Edu- 
cational Cardioscope has been placed in the heart stations at both 
48th St. and 20th St. This has greatly facilitated the teaching of 
ausculation. A library of outstanding movie films and lantern slides 
on cardiovascular diseases has been established. Plastic heart models (12) 
illustrating cardiac silhouettes are utilized in the teaching of heart 
disease. A portable cardioscope has recently been purchased for bed- 
side teaching of ausculation on an audio-visual basis. 

The teaching of internal medicine continues in the intern and 
resident years of training. Starting in July 195 6 we shall have five 
medical residents in training and in addition a senior teaching fellow 
in cardiovascular diseases. 

The teaching aims of this department are embodied in a solid 
foundation of the ar': of history taking and physical diagnosis. Super- 
imposed are the systemic diseases, didactic lectures and the very impor- 
tant clinical experience in out-patient clinic and the hospital. 



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CLINICAL SERVICE 




THEODORE W. STEIGLER, JR., D.O., F.A.C.O.I. 

Director of Clinics 




CLINIC SCENES 



DR. WILLIAM SCOTT 

Chief Supervising Physician 




DR. THEODORE WEINBERG 

Chief Supervising Physician 



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EAR. NOSE and THROAT 











PROCTOLOGY 




OPHTHALMOLOGY 





UROLOGY 





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TUMOR CLINIC 




HEART STATION 




ORTHOPEDICS 




NEURO-PSYCH 




SYPHILOLOGY 





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GASTROENTEROLOGY 



76 





ENDOCRINOLOGY 




THE LAST EXAMS . . . May I8th-i9th, 



1956 




COMPREHENSIVES 




ALUMNI BANQUET-June9th 




78 



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ANATOMICAL 

SCIENCES 

Gross Anatomy • hleuro-Anatomy • 
Embryologi) • Histology 



SARAH W. RUPP, D.O., Professor Emeritus of Neuro-Anatomy 
HERBERT V. DURKEE, D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), Professor Emeritus 

of Histology 
ANGUS G. CATHIE, D.O., Professor — Chairman 
ROBERT BAYARD MILLER, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor 
BLANCHE CLOW ALLEN, A.B., B.S. in Ed., D.O., Assistant 

Professor 
LEMAR F. EISENHUT, JR., D.O., Demonstrator 
DAVID W. CRAGG, D.O., Demonstrator 

LEWIS G. TORRIERI, B.S., M.D., D.O., Instructor— Embry- 
ology 




PROFESSOR ANGUS G. CATHIE, D.O. 
Chairman — Department of Anatomy 



A total of 756 hours is spent with anatomy 
in the freshman ye.ir. Of this total 216 hours 
cover the microscopic courses of histology and 
embryology. The remaining 540 hours are de- 
voted to gross anatomy in the form of lectures, 
conferences and laboratory dissection in a system- 
atic study of the human body. Dissection is 
carried out in small groups. 

In the third year the course in Applied 
Anatomy endeavors to discuss anatomical facts 
from the point of view of their application to 
practical problems met by the physician. Here 
there is emphasis on the relationship of anatomy 
to the practice of Osteopathic Medicine. 

The Harvey School of Anatomy is a regu- 
larly chartered institution for the study of prac- 
tical anatomy, and is housed in the 48th Street 
building. A collection of special dissections, speci- 
mens and models is on display and arranged for 
study. The facilities afford excellent opportuni- 
ties for detailed investigation of normal and 
abnormal structures. The dissecting room is 
equipped with tables and cabinets of special 
demonstration material. 

PROFESSOR EDWIN H. CRESSMEN, D.O. 

M.Sc.(Ost) 

Microscopic Anatomy 



The museum of the College contains speci- 
mens and models in mahogany cases in the main 
auditorium. The collection includes both normal 
and pathological specimens, serial sections, dissec- 
tions and mounted preparations illustrating the 
major diseases. Among the most notable are the 
collection of bone specimens, human embryos, 
Spalteholz preparations, development of the 
cardio-vascular system in plaster, etc. 

The anatomy laboratory houses a museum 
declared by visiting state board inspectors as one 
of the best in the world maintained by any school 
of the healing arts. 

The desirability of flexible spines for teach- 
ing and research is great, for they provide 
possibilities not approached by any other method. 
In order to demonstrate that Dr. Halladay's 
method is reproducible, flexible spines have been 
prepared in the Department of Anatomy accord- 
ing to his directions. 

Such specimens are necessary for the proper 
study and demonstration of total, regional and 
intersegmental motion; for a clearer and more ac- 
curate understanding of the physiologic motions 
of the spine; and for the study of the mechanical 
principles through which they operate. 



J 




PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Physiology • Physiological Chemistry • 
Pharmacology • Toxicology 



PROFESSOR WILLIAM BALDWIN, JR. 
A.B., M.A., D.O., F.A.C.O.I. 

Chairman — Department of Physiology and Pharmacology 




William Baldwin, Jr., A.B., M.A., D.O., F.A.C.O.I., Professor — Chairman 

Spencer G. Bradford, D.O., Associate Professor 

George J. Bergman, D.O., Lecturer — Physiology 

Meyer Kirshbaum, D.O., Demonstrator — Physiology 

Frank B. Falbey, D.O., Assistant 

Kenneth L. Senior, B.S., M.S., D.Sc, Professor — Chairman 

John H. Schall, Jr., A.E., D.O., Assistant Professor 




The present teaching program of the Department of Physiology consists of a 
multiple approach to the education of the student. Didactic lectures are presented in 
regular lecture periods, and during laboratory periods a portion of the class sits in con- 
ference with a member of the department, at which time both the current didactic 
problems and also pr.-ictical applications of the subject at hand are discussed. 

In the first year students are presented the basic principles of physiology; covering 
blood, circulation, respiration, and the fundamental muscular and nervous physiology. 
In the second year the subject matter comprises digestion, kidney, endocrine system and 
the central nervous system of special senses. The second year also covers pharmacology 
and toxicology. The Department of Chemistry though separate, is an integral part of 
any consideration of physiology. Courses are presented in physiological chemistry with 
considerable stress upon the chemistry of the metabolic processes of the human body 
during health and disease. In the second year laboratory instruction in the techniques 
of blood chemistry and instruction in the use of special instruments and equipment 
are given. 

It is the plan of the departments to continue this program, because we feel that 
over the years it has worked well for the benefit of the students. In the future lies the 
amplification of laboratory space and facilities, and we look forward with great anticipa- 
tion to our new buildings with large animal rooms and opportunity to do animal experi- 
mentation on a larger scale. 

Such plans must necessarily include, not only the current part-time teaching 
personnel, but also an expansion into full time personnel with opportunity to carry out 
research, as already planned in the department. 



PROFESSOR KENNETH L. SENIOR 

B.S., M.S., D.Sc. 
Chairman — Department of Chemistry 



82 



OSTEOPATHIC PRINCIPLES 
and TECHNIQUES 



C. Haddon Soden, D.O., M.Sc.(05t), Professor Emeritus 
Edgar O. Holden, A.B., D.O., Litt.D., Professor — Chairman 
David Heilig, A.B., D.O., Clinical Professor 

Barbara Redding, D.O., Assistant Professor — Hospital Clerkship Supervisor 
Richard F. Leedy, D.O., Lecturer 
William C. Soden, D.O., Demonstrator 

Nicholas D. Tretta, B.S., D.O., Demonstrator — Student Health Physician 
Nicholas S. Nicholas, D.O., Demonstrator 
Kermit H. Lyman, D.O., Demonstrator 
Joseph Calder, D.O., Instructor 
Frederick Anne, Jr., D.O., Instructor 
Stanley Dorman, A.B., D.O., Assistant 

William F. Saponaro, A.E., D.O., Clinical Assistant — Hospital Clerkship Super- 
visor, North Center 

Visiting Lecturers 




PROFESSOR EDGAR O. HOLDEN 
A.B., D.O., Litt.D. 

Chairman of the Department 



C. Paul Snyder, D.O., F.O.C.O., 

D.Sc.(Ost) 
T. L. Northrup, D.O. 
George W. Northrup, D.O. 
Wesley P. Dunnington, D.O. 
Richard Feige, D.O. 
William O. Kingsbury, D.O. 
Leonard M. Hillerson, D.D.S. 
W. Kenneth Riland, D.O. 



Robert D. Anderson, D.O. 
Carl Fischer, D.O. 
Clyde W. Dalrymple, D.O. 
Perrin T. Wilson, D.O. 
Howard A. Lippincott, D.O. 
William S. Nicholl, D.O., D.Sc. 
Allan A. Eggleston, D.O. 
Robert H. Abbott, D.O. 




In the first year three courses .ire presented. The Fundament.ils and History course 
covers the development of the philosophy of osteopathy in historical perspective. It is 
here the student is introduced to the importance of the musculo-skeletal component of 
disease in the body as a unit. The course in manipulative diagnosis gives fundamental 
consideration of the mechanics of the spinal column segmentally and as a complex, 
stressing the importance of structural-functional relationship and their interdependence. 
The third course continues in the same vein with detailed consideration of the func- 
tional anatomy of the vertebral column and the general nature and effects of the lesion 
locally and segmentally through the central and autonomic nervous systems. 

Likewise the second year offers three courses. Appendicular diagnosis and tech- 
niques, and detailed study of the spine and its physiologic movements leading to prin- 
ciples of adjustment and corrective forces are covered in detail. 

Four courses are presented during the third year. A course in diagnosis and man- 
agement is given by a group of visiting lecturers. The topics are multiple in content 
and approach. Here the student may weigh differences of opinion and realize the various 
approaches that may be used in difficult problems. An invaluable course in athletic 
injuries is given, very often complemented by voluntary night sessions, depending on 
student interest. The diagnosis and treatment of athletic injuries, with techniques for 
strapping, are taught in detail. Courses in special techniques and bedside technique are 
also taught in the third year. 

The fourth year finds the student utilizing the ten courses in the clinic and hospital. 
In the clinic the senior student aims to evaluate the osteopathic indices by palpation and 
direct methods in conjunction with history taking and dealing with the presenting 
symptom or symptom pattern. Hospital clerkship involves application of bedside 
manipulative techniques. 



PROFESSOR DAVID HEILIG, A.B., D.O. 



84 





Seven women and 373 men answered the roll call of the student body 
when college opened this year. The Class of '59 began its climb to the D.O. 
degree with a population of 87. The sophomores opened with 98. The junior 
and senior classes each had ^7 . The 3 80th member of the student body was 
R. Bayard Miller, Assistant Professor of Anatomy, who was registered as a 
special student. The average age of the freshman class was 24 years. The overall 
college age average was 2 5. Forty-nine per cent of our students were married 
and 3 5 per cent or 134 were veterans of either World War II or the Korean 
conflict. Seventy-three freshmen had baccalaureate degrees. It was interesting 
to note that 81 per cent of our students had undergraduate degrees and eight 
students had higher degrees. There were 153 colleges represented in our student 
body. Since our students came from only 1 5 states and the District of Colum- 
bia, this was a very healthy spread in terms of academic identity. 



52S?5c^ 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS— 1956 



From left to right . . . Virst Row: Kelley, J. A.; Petteruti, J. L.; Angstadt, H. B. 
Kubacki, T. R.; Avallone, M. F.; Roth, M. L.; Goldberg, R.; Noyes, W. H.; Setnar 
M. I.; Melachrinos, W. S.; Caldwell, H. M.; Lowers, J. E. Second Rou-: Wills, L. A. 
McGowan, C. K.; Johnston, P. E.; Curley, J. B.; Budnett, S.; Greenspun, B.; Leopold 
J. L; Blitz, P. M.; Danley, W. M.; Steinberg, S. M.; Scott, J. R. Third Roiv: Conlon, 
J. F.; Spellman, H.; Glickel, J.; Kirschenbaum, R. I.; Braslow, P.; Frank, A. J.; Linn, R. 
Barbell, B. S.; Riviello, B. Fourth Row: Carr, H. W.; Bogutz, R. M.; Rubin, G. 
D'Antonio, L. F.; Jenkins, C. T.; Shapiro, B. P.; Lcvine, M. W.; Walla'ce, J. H. 
Lagomarsino, J. L. Fifth Ron: Barkus, D. R.; Moody, T.; Miller, S. L.; Zinberg, S. S. 
Block, W. A.; Thome, D. H.; Tufankjian, E.; Silbereisen, F. E.; Green, J. E. Sixth 
Row: Addis, H. M.; Swain, R. B.; Cribbs, W. D.; Maglietta, J. L.; Halin, L. M.; Gold- 
man, D. J.; Mercanti, R. J.; Goloff, E. B. Seventh Row: Herrick, K. H.; Anderson, 
W. A.; Greenholtz, D.; Hirsh, L. W.; Waties, W. M.; Sutula, M.; Kominsky, S.; 
Manin, L. 



It" 




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d"^ 



SPONSORS 

Dr. & Mrs. Carson L. Adams 

Dr. Blanche C. Allen 

Dr. Jerome Axelrod 

Dr. Clarence E. Baldwin 

Dr. William Baldwin, Jr. 

Dr. Frederic H. Barth 

Dr. Harry E. Binder 

Dr. C. E. Bohannon 

Dr. Albert Bonier 

Dr. William Brandt 

Dr. William E.Briglia 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter A. Capitain 

Dr. Samuel L. Caruso 

Dr. John L. Cionci 

Dr. William F. Daiber 

Mr. John DeAngelis 

Dr. Andrew D. DeMasi 

Dr. Ira Walton Drew 

Dr. James M. Eaton 

Dr. Lester Eisenberg 

Dr. H. Walter Evans 

Dr. Victor R. Fisher 

Dr. Arthur M. Flack, Jr. 

Dr. Quentin R. Flickinger 

Dr. Dewaine L. Gedney 

Dr. H. Mahlon Gehman 

Dr. William Gillespi 

Dr. Joseph E. Gilletto 

Dr. Frank E. Gruber 

Dr. George H. Guest 

Dr. Cecil Harris 

Dr. David Heilig 

Dr. Edgar O.HoIden 

Dr. Herman Kohn 

Dr. Otto M. Kurschner 

Dr. Phillip M. Lessig 

Dr. j. Ernest Leuzinger 

Dr. Abraham N. Levin 

Dr. Frederick A. Long 

Dr. Paul T. Lloyd 

Dr. Theodore C. Loux 

Dr. WilburP. Lutz 

Dr. Arnold Melnick 

Dean Sherwood R. Mercer 

Dr. William G. Morris 

Dr. George W. Northrup 

Dr. O. Edwin Owen 

Dr. F. Munro Purse 

Dr. Joseph Py 

Dr. Barbara Redding 

Dr. Caroline M. Renzi 

Dr. Earl F. Riceman 

Mr. Maurice Rossman 

Dr. Irwin Rothman 

Mr. Thomas Rowland 

Dr. Raymond L. Ruberg 

Dr. John W. Sheetz, Jr. 

Dr. Sylvia M. Slifer 

Dr. Charles W. Snyder 

Dr. Williams. Spaeth 

Dr. Harry I. Stein 

Dr. Hartley R. Steinsnyder 

Dr. H. Willard Sterrett, Jr. 

Dr. Leonard J. Starer 

Dr. Carlton Street 

Dr. A. Aline Swift 

Dr. Ralph J. Tomei 

Dr. W. B. Underwood, Jr. 

Dr. Enrique G. Vergara 

Drs. Harold C. and 

RuthV.E.Waddel 
Dr. Leo C. Wagner 
Dr. J. Craig Walsh 
Dr. Theodore Weinberg 
Dr. Kenneth L. Wheeler 
Dr. Robert A. Whinney 
Dr. Galen S. Young 
Dr. Paul S. Young 



EDITOR 




JAMES C. CHIMERAKIS 
Editor-in-Chief 




ALBERT GOLIN 
Associate Editor 




EDWARD J. MINEMAN 
Assistant to Editors 




BETTY J. SMITH 
Nursing Editor 



BUSINESS 
MANAGER 




DAVID BRONSTEIN 
Business Manager 




MURRAY N. MATEZ 
Associate Business Manager 




BRUCE A. BOCHMAN 
Assistant Business Manager 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Robert W. England 
Samson A, In-wald 
Howard C. B. Peckins 
S. Paul Sadick 

ART STAFF 
Paul W. Weiss 
Nancy Lod?to 

BUSINESS STAFF 
R. William Bradway 
Frank A. Cerra 
John C. Crawford 
Albert F. D'Alonzo 
Robinson G. Fry 
Nick A. Marino 
Charles Piatt Pritchard 
Ralph Schwartz 
Paul S. Snoke 
Barry D. Walp 



'56' 
SYNAPSIS 



PATRONS 

Dr. Theodore Asnis 

Dr. William Barnhurst 

Dr. Spencer G. Bradford 

Dr. Harold L. Bruner 

Dr. Donald E. Clark 

Dr. George H. Court 

Dr. David W. Cragg 

Dr. Edwin H. Cressman 

Dr. H. A. D'Alonzo 

Dr. H. E. D'Alonzo, Sr. 

Dr. John E. Devine 

Dr. LeMar F. Eisenhut 

Dr. Nicholas C. Eni 

Dr. Frank B. Falbey 

Dr. Albert J. Fornace 

Dr. James A. Frazer 

Mr. Thomas W. Gardner 

Dr. Arnold Gerber 

Dr. Charles A. Hemmer 

Dr. Morton S. Herskowitz 

Dr. Anthony S. Jannelli 

Dr. Oscar H. Katz 

Dr. Meyer Kirshbaum 

Dr. Max Marcus 

Dr. A. Mascioli 

Dr. Martin S. Neifield 

Dr. Herman E. Poppe 

Dr. J. B. Rapp 

Miss Irma J. Reese, R.N. 

Mr. K. Hobart Roatch 

Dr. Dominic J. Salerno 

Dr. Thomas F. Santucci 

Dr. William Scott 

Dr. Walter Sch'wartz 

Dr. Morton Silver 

Dr. Francis J. Smith 

Dr. Theodore W. Stiegler, Jr. 

Dr. Nicholas D. Tretta 

Dr. Sidney M. Weitberg 

Dr. Weston H. Werst 

Dr. Bernard Witlin 

Mr. Eli Al Young 

Broad Street Medical Laboratory 

Cooper's Sport Center 

Garden Court Barber Shop 

Hospital Television Rental Service 

Paul's Delicatessen 

PCO Social Service Department 

Grant's Pharmacy 

Walnut'Street DcLuxc Laundromat 

Brady's Cafe 

4>i;i' Students' Wives 

Millicent David 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Alexander D. Xenakis 
Thomas L. Moy 
John C. DeGhetto 
Wellden Pyle, Jr. 




POTT 
Kiij 

WED. ' TFIITRS 



Tribute does not always come to 
those -who warrant it. This is due to 
leaders w^ho meditate lightly on the as- 
sistance given them. To say that I have 
been editor-in-chief of the 1956 SYN- 
APSIS and not acknowledge the en- 
deavors of those ■who believed there 
could be a SYNAPSIS this year and j^ 
persevered to make our dream a reality, 
w^ould be like saying that an embryo 
could survive w^ithout the nutriment 
supplied by its yolk. Therefore, I w^ish 
to express my thanks to my staff, w^ith 
special mention to Thomas L. Moy and 
Alexander D. Xenakis, photographers; 
Wm. Paul Weiss for his excellent cover 
sketch and other artistic w^ork along 
w^ith Nancy Lodato; to my business 
managers David Bronstein, Murray N. 
Matez and Bruce A. Bochman w^ho as- 
sisted so materially; to my "never say 
no" editorial assistants, Albert Golin, 
Edward Minehan and Betty Jane Smith. 
If it were not for these people there 
would not have been a 1956 SYNAPSIS! 

James C. Chimerakis 

Editor-in-Chief 

1956 SYNAPSIS 




JOSEPH C. ANDREWS, D.O.— Rhode Island DONALD A. BAXTER, D.O. — Rhode Island JAMES J. BRESLIN, D.O. — Detroit 

FRANK C. BARONE, D.O. — Miami WILLIAM E. BETTS, JR., D.O. — Philadelphia 
DAVIO BRONSTEIN, D.O.— Harrisburg FRANK V. CARUSO, D.O. — York, Pa. FRANK A. SERRA, D.O. — Miami 

ROBERT W. CAPITAN, D.O. — Massachusetts JAMES C. CHIMERAKIS, D.O. — Allentown 

EUGENE COHEN, D.O.— Philadelphia JEROME B. COHEN, D.O.— Detroit GERALD COTLER, D.O.— Philadelphia 

JOHN A. D'ALESSANDRO, D.O. — Ohio JOHN C. CRAWFORD, D.O. — Philadelphia ROBERT G. DE RUE, D.O. — Ohio 

ALBERT F. D'ALONZO, D.O.— Philadelphia JOHN C. DEGHETTO, D.O. — Ohio ROBERT V. ENGLAND, D.O.— Philadelphia 

DANTE DIMARZIO, D.O. — Michigan ALVIN D. DUBIN, D.O.— Philadelphia ALAN M. FALLICK, D.O. — Philadelphia 

F. JAY FRIEDLIN, D.O.— Philadelphia E. MILTON FRIEDMAN, D.O. — Philadelphia ROBINSON G. FRY, D.O.—Allentown 

DONALD D. GREIF, D.O. — California JULES RUSSELL GLOVER, D.O.— Ohio ALBERT GOLIN, D.O.— Philadelphia 

THOMAS B. GRIFFITH, D.O.—Allentown FREDERICK GROSSBART, D.O.— Ohio EUGENE R. HEAGEN, D.O.— Michigan 

WILLIAM ROWLAND HEMSLEY, JR., D.O. — Los Angeles JOHN A. HIPPLE, D.O. — Detroit SAMSON A. INWALD, D.O. — Detroit 

RODNEY TRYGVE JACOBSON, D.O. — Miami CHARLES H. KROH, D.O. — Allentown DAVID A. KELLAM, D.O. — Detroit 

FREDERIC JOSEPH JAEGER, II, D.O.— Ohio JAY HARRIS JOSEPH, D.O.— Philadelphia DONALD W. KETNER, D.O.— Detroit 

CARL KODROFF, D.O. — Philadelphia RICHARD S. LATTA, D.O.— Lancaster BERNARD JOHN LETOURENEAU, D.O. — Miami 

JACK LEVITT, D.O. — Lancaster HENRY S. LIEBERT, JR., D.O. — Philadelphia JOHN EDWARD LOVE, D.O. — Lancaster 

ARTHUR AUGUSTINE LODATO, D.O. — Miami RALPH A. LUONGO, D.O.— Michigan NICK A. MARINO, D.O. — Ohio 

JOSEPH EARLE MAKANT, JR., D.O.— Massachusetts CHARLES NICHOLAS MARRA, D.O.— Erie 

LEO MICHAEL MARTSUKIS, D.O.— Los Angeles MURRAY NORMAN MATEZ, D.O.— Philadelphia ROBERT L. MEALS, D.O.— Philadelphia 

^^^^ FREDERICK R. MELHORN, D.O.— Philadelphia LESTER C. MILLARD, D.O.— Massachusetts i«5^ ' eJ''^ 

S. PAUL SADICK, D.O.— Detroit MILTON METZMAN, D.O.— Philadelphia EDWARD JOHN MINEHAN, D.O.— Massachusetts 

STANLEY ORONS, D.O.— Philadelphia JACK ANTHONY MINUTELLA, D.O.— Michigan JAMES J. MINAFLA.N, D.O.— Maine 
SEYMOUR PIWOZ, D.O. — Philadelphia THOMAS LOUIE MOY, D.O. — Philadelphia LOIS L. GEHRIS MOLL, D.O.^Philadelphia 

JOHN PETER POLULICH, D.O. — Philadelphia HOWARD C. B. PECKINS, D.O. — Michigan DAVID ASHLEY PATRIQUIN, D.O.— Maine 

THOMAS FRANCIS A. POWELL, D.O. — Philadelphia CHARLES PLATT PRITCHARD, D.O.— Massachusetts 

JOSEPH J. PRYKANOSKI, D.O.— Philadelphia WELLDEN PYLE, JR., D.O.— York WALTER T. ROBINSON, JR., D.O. — Detroit 

WILLIAM D. RUSIN, D.O. — California HENRY SALKIND, D.O. — Philadelphia RALPH SCHWARTZ, D.O. — Lancaster 

V^^:^^^^^^-—'^ GEORGE BARINGER SLIFER, JR., D.O.— Philadelphia IRVIN S. SMITH, D.O.— Philadelphia 

PAUL STEPHEN SNOKE, D.O. — Philadelphia RICHARD K. SNYDER, D.O. — Allentown FRANKLIN M. STEIN, D.O. — Philadelphia 

JAMES J. SULLIVAN, D.O. — Michigan EDWARD S. SWIATKOWSKI, D.O. — Philadelphia BARRY DONALD WALP, D.O. — Lancaster 

HERBERT WIENER, D.O. — Philadelphia J. J. WILDMON, D.O.— California LEONARD V. WORTH, JR., D.O. — Maine 

J. BRENDAN WYNNE, JR., D.O. — Rhode Island ALEXANDER D. XENAKIS, D.O. — Philadelphia JOSEPH YURKANIN, D.O. — Ohio 

WARREN C. YOUNG, JR., D.O.— Ohio FRANK F. ZACCARDI, D.O.— Philadelphia 

RALPH ZAROFF, D.O. — Harrisburg MICHAEL WILLIAM ZARRILLI, D.O. — Los Angeles ABRAHAM ZELLIS, D.O. — Michigan 

R. W. BRADWAY, D.O. — Detroit BRUCE A. BOCHMAN, D.O. — Massachusetts 



BOX SCORE 
Married — 58 
Sinsle — 3 9 
Children — 40 
Veterans — 3 6 
100% Internships 
100% A.O.A. membership 
Largest class {97) in last 5 yi 



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PATHOLOGICAL 
SCIENCES 



92 




PROFESSOR JOSEPH F. PY 

D.O., M.Sc.(Ost) 

Chairman — Department of 

Microbiology and Public Health 



CLINICAL CHEMISTRY . . . 





4^ 



^ 




s.^. 



il^ii. 





PROFESSOR JOHN H. SCHALL, JR. 

A.B., D.O. 

Assistant Professor — Chemistry 




RADIOLOGY 



PROFESSOR 
PAUL T. LLOYD 
D.O., M.Sc.(Ost), 
D.Sc, F.A.C.O.S. 
Chairvtan — Depart- 
ment of Radiology 




^^^ 




P NEUROLOGY 





PCO this year enrolled 382 students, 88 seniors, ^7 juniors, 99 sopho- 
mores, 97 freshmen, and one special student. Our position with regard to other 
osteopathic colleges and to medical colleges was very favorable. Enrollment of 
freshmen this year was on the descending curve almost everywhere. We had 
our normal quota. Seventy-seven of the class of '5 8 had undergraduate degrees 
which represented 63 colleges, 10 states and the District of Columbia. The 
veteran enrollment of the class was 36 which accounted for more than one-third 
of the class. 

F. CINELLI 

Vresident 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS— 1956 



From left to right . . . Tint Row: Senese, R. J.; Lock, I.; Forim, M. A.; Scalene, H. A.; 
Gunderman, W. C; Brown, G. D.; Cinelli, F. J.; Davis, F. E.; Cross, C. S.; Kroser, 

A. S.; DiSanto, W. E.; Liebeknecht, C. Second Row: Hoffler, J. G.; Gilliss, A. G.; 
Lavin, E.; Greisman, P. A.; Carroll, E. T.; Levin, H.; Farrow, D.j Bisk, M.; Myers, 
C. A.; Bender, C. R.; Greber, A.; Walsh, J. A. Third Row: Martini, L. W.; Tini, A.; 
Godorov, J.; Fucile, F. A.; Luca, L. J.; Arvanetes, E.; Depfer, C. A.; McCormick, 
R. D.; Cleff, R. B.; Kilonsky, A.; Ellick, B. J. Fourth Row: Smith, C; Syndman, 

B. G.; Ludwig, L. R.; Steskel, H.; James, E. E.; DiSanto, C. J.; Walsh, J. J.; Light- 
stone, H.; Kilonsky, F. A.; Peraino, V. P.; Greif, M. C. Fifth Ron: Cohen, M. H.; 
Stavrand, H. M.; Novak, C. J.; English, W. R.; Garnsey, H. H.; DiMarcangelo, M. C; 
Holt, M. J.; Bilbow, W. D.; Kabel, S.; Smith, L. C; Smith, C. E. Sixth Row: Axelrod, 
N.; Delio F. A.; Spangler, M. L.; Heins, W.; Canaday, J. H.; Greenspan, D. J. Seventh 
Row: Millman, J. D.; Zuckerman, S.; Travis, E.; LoBello, S. E.; Tabby, G. B.; Kaplan, 
L. M.; Popowich, L.; Morgenthaler, A.; Ringold, G. I.; Wiley, D. 



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JUNIORS 1956 




j*^! <«>* 



Ernest Atella ^^^B J^^^^^^^f 



Samuel P. Barker, III William J. Athe 



Robert S. Be 



W^^.- 




Eugene P. Austin 



Bernard E. Blank 






I 



Richard D. Broske 



Lester K. Burge, Jr 




Richard B. Carnicky 







Stanley W. Bilski 



Ettore R. Ca 




i^Jl 



Norman M. Charney 



Henry V. Chac 





Ji 



Paul K. Charnov 






Anthony S. Ciminera 









Arthur M. Coope 



rW -»» mJ 







99 




Charles O. Guiliani — 
Class President 



Jerome I. Flick 
Donald A. Goodr 



, i^ Allan R. Fox 

Howard R. Foster M" "^ • Harding, Jr 



Theodore C. Garland 



John J. Heiser, Jr. 




I 




William W. Longenecke 



Herman P. Kuehn 
Robert C. MacAusl 



Dale W. Kuiper 
Homer F. Macke 



Anthony G. Leone 
Michael A. Majka 




Marvin H. Malamut 




^f<W* 



^^Ti 



Anthony V. Marturano 



James J. Malli 



Eleanor V. Masterson 




Stanley C. Montrom 




V *^ 




102 



Milton R. Redlitz 



ii 



Leo J. Robb 



Marvin L. Ro 



f<n J 



Maurice S. Rowley 



Philip P. Saponaro 



Auk 




Joseph E. Spear 



Donald F. Stanton 



Edwin Z. Stein 



1^ ^^ I, 





Jerome H. Sulman 




\. 



■^ ^-' 




J William C. Wagner, Jr. ^^Vfl^^^^H I*^"' ^- Weiss 

Salvatore R. Vasile Burton K. Weiser Richard W. Whitaker 





V 



Walter O. Willoughby, Jr 




A..V 



1 



James E. Xanthopoulos 




Junior Activities 



From left to right— First Ron.- F. T. Sarama, W. C. Wagner, A. F. DeMarco, 
R. W. Pearson, C. O. Guiliani, E. V. Masterson, L. J. Robb, L. R. Fina, S. R. 
Vasile, E. Castiglione, M. H. Malamut. Second Row: E. F. Atella, L. M. Rorro, 
B. K. Weiser, A. R. Fox, J. C. Kramlich, D. H. Belsky, R. C. Greer, L. E. 
Miller, M. J. Papp, J. I. Flicker, N. S. Knee. Third Ron: E. H. Kliger, 
L. M. Kirifides, R. B. Carnicky, S. B. Herrick, H. Kuehn, D. W. Kuiper, 
M. G. Jaspan, P. K. Charnov, N. M. Charney, B. E. Blank, H. N. Pepe. 
Fourth Roiv: S. W. Bilski, J. E. Spear, A. H. Atkins, R. S. Bear, W. W. 
Longenecker, T. C. Garland, P. P. Saponaro, E. J. Lindenbaum, A. J. Keller, 
R. C. MacAuslan, H. L. Slifer, J. J. Mallon. Fifth Roic: R. A. Deighan, J. T. 
Harding, H. F. Mackey, A. R. Amalfitano, W. S. Kip, W. O. Willoughby, 
D. K. Shumway, M. A. Majka, R. Duncombe. Sixth Roiv: A. M. Cooper, 
J. J. Heiser, M. R. Redlitz, L. K. Burge, M. L. Rosner, R. D. Hockstein, 
D. F. Stanton. Seventh Ron: R. S. Ravetz, H. R. Foster, L. J. Jordan, H. S. 
Hershev, Z. Stein, W. A. Schmidt, M. S. Rowley, E. P. Austin, H. E. Triehy. 




ATLAS CLUB 

STYLOID CHAPTER 










Senior Members: Frank Barone, William Bradway, John Crawford, John D Alessandro. John 
DeGhetto, Robert De Rue, Frederick Jaeger, Richard Latta, Bernard Letourneau, Leo Martsukis, 
Thomas Moy, Howard Pcckins, William Rusin, Edward Swiatowski, Barry Walp, Leonard Worth. 



Pres.: Albert D'Alonzo 




Pres.: Js 



Vice Pres.: Richard Deigh; 
Sect.: Donald Stanton 
Treas.: Anthony Ciminera 



Vice Pres.: Donald 
Sect.: John Scott 
Treas.: James Walla 



V 



•i^^ =r 



The Atlas Club was founded in Kirksville, Missouri, in 1898. It is the largest and 
oldest national osteopathic fraternal order, having a chapter at each of the osteopathic 
colleges. 

Styloid chapter, at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, was founded in 1924 
with the objectives of exercising fraternal functions and furthering osteopathic educa- 
tion and research. The brotherhood, which recently purchased a new eighteen room 
chapter house at 4636 Spruce Street, has consistently been a leader in PCO campus 
activities and is an integral part of campus life both socially and educationally. Twenty- 
eight new members were activated into the Atlas Club this year. 




106 



PHI SIGMA GAMMA 

ZETA CHAPTER 

The Phi Sigma Gamma Fraternity was formed in June, 1915, in Chicago by a 
merger of two chapters of Phi Omicron Gamma and three chapters of Phi Sigma Beta. 
At that time both of these groups were National Osteopathic Fraternities. The Zeta 
chapter at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy was organized in September, 1917, 
through the concerted efforts of Dr. Nathaniel Boyd, 2nd, and Dr. Rice le Grand Cooper 
who were alumni of the Alpha chapter at Kirksville, Missouri. 

Chapters at each of the Osteopathic Colleges put Phi Sigrna Gamma on a national 
basis: — Alpha Chapter at Kirksville, Mo.; Beta Chapter at Los Angeles, California; 
Gamma Chapter at Chicago, 111.; Delta Chapter at Des Moines, Iowa; Epsilon Chapter at 
Kansas City, Mo.; and Zeta Chapter here in Philadelphia, Penna. 

Each year the fraternity has many social and educational activities. Early on the 
fraternity calendar are the rushing functions which are designed to be instructive and 
entertaining. Each Christmas the fraternity gives a party complete with a "Santa Claus" 
for all the children from the clinic. The social highlight of the year is the Alumni 
Banquet each spring when alumni and brothers gather to renew old acquaintances and 
to make new ones. 





Pres.: Charles H. Kroh 



Vice Pres.: Walter O. Willoughby 
Treas.: Paul S. Snoke 




Pres.: John B. Wynne, Jr. 



Vice Pres.: James Xanthopoulos 
Treas.: James C. Kramlich 



Senior Members: Joseph Andrews, Donald Baxter, William Betts, Jr., Bruce 
Bochman, James Breslin, Robert Capitain, Frederic Friedlin, Robinson Fry, 
Thomas Griffith, Eugene Heagen, Rodney Jacobsen, David Kellam, Donald 
Ketner, Henry Liebert, Arthur Lodato, John Love, Joseph Makant, Nick 
Marino, Robert Meals, Frederick Melhorn, Edward Minehan, Charles Pritchard 
Welden Pyle, George Slifer, Richard Snyder, James Sullivan, Alexander 
Xenakis, Warren Young. 




IOTA TAU SIGMA 



DELTA CHAPTER 




Senior Members: Frank Caruso, Francis Cerra, Ralph Luongo, John PoluUich, II, Joseph Yurkanin, 
Frank Zaccardi, Michael Zarrilli. 



Delta chapter of Iota Tau Sigma was founded and received its charter in 1903. 
National headquarters is in Kirksville, Missouri, where the founding of the fraternity 
took place on December 3, 1902. 

Delta is the oldest osteopathic fraternity on the PCO campus. In maintaining this 
position, it has made tremendous strides in the field of true fraternalism, in regard to the 
college, the fraternity and osteopathy itself. Celebration of Delta's fiftieth anniversary in 
November 195 3 was climaxed by the purchase of a new house at 4640 Spruce Street. 
This long-awaited reality was made possible through the efforts of a group of the 
alumni. In September 195 5, an alumni organization was formed, electing Dr. Wm. 
Baldwin as its first chairman. 

The objectives of the fraternity, "shall be the affording of substantial benefits and 
the promotion of Fraternal relations during college and professional life and the advance- 
ment of the science of osteopathy, as taught by Andrew Taylor Still and his followers." 
With these objectives in mind, our brotherhood at Delta which totals sixty-nine active 
members, plus alumni are better prepared for their tasks as osteopathic physicians. 




Pres.: Ralph Luong 



Sect.: Leo Robb 
Treas.: Mike Zarrilli 
Historian: John Polullich, II 



110 



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Senior Members: Eugene Cohen, Jerome Cohen, Gerald Cotler, Alvin Dubin, Alan Fallick, 
Edward Friedman, Julius Glover, Albert Golin, Donald Greif, Samson Inwald, Carl KodrofF, 
Jack Levitt, Murray Matez, Milton Metzman, Stanley Orons, Sanford Sadick, Henry Salkind, 
Ralph Schwartz, Irvin Smith, Franklin Stein, Herbert Wiener, John Wildmann, Ralph Zaroff, 
Abraham Zetlis. 



LAMBDA OMICRON 

mm^ GAMMA 




Pres.: Jay Joseph 



Vice Pres.: Norman Knee 
Sect.: Frederick Grossbari 
Treas.: David Bronstein 




'V,. 




CADUCEUS CHAPTER 



This nonsectarian, national fraternal organization was founded at the Philadelphia 
College of Osteopathy in 1924 by ten men, a few of whom are still members of the 
P.C.O. faculty. There is a L.O.G. chapter at each of the osteopathic colleges with the 
exception of Kirksville and plans are now in progress to activate a chapter there. 

L.O.G. fraternity has a very extensive alumni program with alumni chapters 
throughout the nation. Each year there is a convention at the national level bringing 
together the brotherhood from all over the country. The convention city for this year 
was Asbury Park, New Jersey. In 1957, Los Angeles is the chosen site. 

Caduceus, the founding chapter of L.O.G. fraternity, has presently over one 
hundred members and the chapter house is located at 242 S. 47th St. 



f 1 



CHRISTIAN 

OSTEOPATHIC 

SOCIETY 



The Christian osteopathic society was founded in 19 56 By Robert 
England '56. A world-wide organization for physicians in practice 
has grown out of this. The purpose of the society is to provide fellow- 
ship, Bible study, and other functions for students who believe in 
Jesus Christ as Saviour and Lord, and who seek to help mankind 
spiritually as well as physically. In view of the important position of 
the physician as a leader in his community, Christian service is em- 
phasized. 




Pres.: Robert England 



Vice Pres.: Lester Burge, Jr. 
Sect.-Treas.: John C. Crawford 



Senior Members: William Hemsley, Jr., Howard Peckins, Robert England, 
John C. Crawford. 





Senior Members: David Bronstein, Eugene Cohen, Jerome Cohen, 
Gerald Cotler, Alvin Dubin, Alan Fallick, Edward Friedman, Albert 
Golin, Donald Greif, Frederick Grossbart, Jay Joseph, Carl KodrofF, 
Jack Levitt, Murray Matez, Milton Metzman, Seymour Piwoz, 
Sanford Sadick, Henry Salkind, Ralph Schwartz, Irvin Smith' 
Franklin Stein, Herbert Wiener, John Wildmann, Ralph Zaroff, 
Abraham Zellis. 



HILLEL 




Pres.: Samson Inwald 



The Hillel organization has been serving the cultural and spiritual needs of the 
Jewish students of P.C.O. for more than six years. Through its programs of lectures, 
concerts and social affairs, the Hillel Foundation in the Philadelphia area makes possible 
cultural opportunities outside the college community as well as within it. 

Founded by Dr. Gordon of Hillel, the Branch at P.C.O. has had Rabbi Samuel 
Berkowitz of the Louis Marshall House as its advisor for the past two years. Under Rabbi 
Berkowitz's able leadership, a continuous program of regular meetings has been instituted 
at P.C.O. These "luncheon meetings," complementing the extremely full academic 
program carried by the students, are exclusive with the Hillel Foundation at P.C.O. 
At any one of these sessions it is not unusual to have up to eighty members of the 
organization assembled to lunch on sandwiches and cokes and then to spend the re- 
mainder of the hour listening to a lecture or watching a film. Topics are variegated, but 
all are intended to educate, inspire or bring into sharper focus our responsibilities to the 
community and profession. 

Available to all Hillel members are the activities carried on at the Louis Marshall 
House, 202 S. 36th Street. Here, weekly dances, social and religious programs, as well 
as dining facihties are utihzed by the affiliates at P.C.O. Counseling service headed by 
Rabbi Berkowitz and his staff has been used by many of the members of the organization. 

We at P.C.O. are proud of the fact that we are the only graduate school in the 
country to have a Hillel Foundation on campus. 



Vice Pres.: Erwin Kli; 



115 




INACRE 



Linacre society is the Catholic physicians' guild at P.C.O., meeting the first Tuesday 
of each month, at which time students as well as practicing physicians meet to discuss 
topics concerning the many varied moral and ethical aspects of medical practice. Linacre 
is honored in having as its spiritual director Reverend John Erhardt, S.J., of the faculty 
of nearby St. Joseph's College. The culmination of the year's activities is held each 
spring at which time the Catholic members of the student body and the practicing 
physicians and their guests attend the Annual Communion Breakfast. 







Pres.: Albert D'AIonzo 



Senior Members: Joseph Andrews, Frank Barone, Francis Cerra, John Dalessandro, John DeGhetto 
Eugene Heagen, Bernard Letourneau, Ralph Luongo, Charles Marra, Edward Minehan, Jack 
M.nutella, Thomas Moy, John Poiulich, II, Joseph Prykanoski, William Rusin, James Sullivan, 
Edward Swiatowski, Leonard Worth, John Wynne, Jr., Joseph Yurkanin, Frank Zaccardi, Michael 





Pres.: CHARLES PRITCHARD 
Sect.-Treas.: JOSEPH ANDREWS 
Librarian: DALE KUIPER 
Accompanist: LEONARD WORTH 
Director: FRANK KUYKENDALL 



GLEE CLUB 



The PCO Glee Club was rejuvenated in 1949 as an all-male 
organization which put on a highly successful performance of "South 
Pacific." The following year members of the School of Nursing lent 
their support by joining the group, thus widening its musical scope. 

In the past five years, under the direction of Frank Kuykendall, 
the group has steadily progressed to its present status. This year, 
besides entertaining at various college functions, the Glee Club has 
sung at several churches throughout the city. 

At the annual spring concert several sacred and secular numbers 
were performed. The final portion of the concert was devoted to 
selections from "Carousel." 

The group has been very fortunate to have Leonard Worth as its 
regular pianist. 



Carol Beckley 
Robert Berger 
Donald Bottomly 
Marie Bybel 
Susan Clymer 
Theresa DeMuro 
Anne English 
Wayne English 
Hazel Greiner 
Jane Groff 
Joanne Hall 
Christine Kearsley 
Joanne Labezius 



Richard Kiszonas 
Joan Mezget 
Nancy Nielsen 
Arthur Pappas 
Virginia Rice 
Patricia Sandford 
Sally Struse 
Jerome Sulman 
J. Edward Thomas 
Nancy J. Weinert 
Kay Winchester 
Winifred Wheeler 



117 



STUDENT COUNCIL '56 



The student body is represented by student council members who are 
elected by each of the four classes. Through these representatives, all students 
have a voice in matters pertaining to their welfare and organizations. 

The student council exercises a general supervision over student organi- 
zations, activities and serves to promote cooperation and harmony among the 
students, faculty, administration and alumni. Dean Sherwood R. Mercer acts 
as faculty advisor and mediator. 

This year student council undertook the task of revising the constitution 
and workings started by the body in 1954. 

Two dances, one in the spring and another in the fall, highlighted the 
year's social calendar along with the annual student council picnic which was 
held at Summerton Pool. The council also sponsors The Axone, a school, pub- 
lication and allocates funds for Y.M.C.A. membership and the glee club. 













j> )^ , » 





GEORGE SLIFER 

President 

Pres.: George Slifer 
Vice-Pres.: Wayne Englisk 
Sect.: Richard Deighan 
Treas.: James Xanthopoulos 

Seniors: 

Charles Pritchard 
Frank Barone 
Frederick Jaeger 
Henry Salkind 

Juniors: 
John Heiser 
Harry Pepe 

Sophomores: 
Julian Millman 
Robert Berger 
Joseph Scaffidi 

Freshmen: 
Marjorie Roth 
Jerry Leopold 
William Anderson 
Tomulyss Moody 



FREDERICK JAEGER 



CHARLES PRITCHARD 



SHERWOOD R. MERCER 

Advisor 




HENRY SALKIND 



118 



STUDENTS' WIVES 



Above and beyond their household duties, many wives are mem- 
bers of a school group which is further dedicated to the better 
understanding of their husbands' profession ... the Student Wives 
Organization. 

Through the media of cake selling, dances and other affairs, the 
girls have promoted good will and funds enough to add several hundred 
dollars worth of books to the college library, purchase new drapes for 
the auditorium stage and many other items which help to beautify our 
school. 

Whether it is a lecture on some phase of medicine, an evaluation 
of the problems and responsibilities of the physician's wife, a "cake 
sale" campaign for additional funds, or an old fashioned square dance 
in the auditorium, the wives consistently come through with sincere 
enthusiasm and a will to succeed. 





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ACADEMY of 

APPLIED OSTEOPATHY 



The Undergraduate Academy of Applied Osteopathy 
was organized in 1949. This group is a division of the Gradu- 
ate Academy of Applied Osteopathy and is responsible directly 
to the committee and to the board of governors of the parent 
organization. As such, it is in no way a part of the college. 
The purpose of the academy is to afford an opportunity to the 
student who is interested in developing the science and art of 
manual dexterity; to learn additional techniques; and to hear 
and meet physicians in the field. 

The academy is open for membership to freshmen in the 
third trimester, providing that all scholarship conditions are 
met. Membership in the undergraduate academy better quahfies 
one for membership in the graduate academy, and provides 
a greater scope of knowledge concerning osteopathic principles 
and techniques. 



Senior Members: Donald Bax- 
ter, Bruce Bochman, William 
Bradway, James Breslin, 
David Bronstein, Robert Cap- 
itain, John Crawford, Rob- 
ert England, Robinson Fry, 
William Hemsley, Robert 
Meals, Howard Peckins, Paul 
Snoke. 




Pres.: David Patriquin 



Vice Pres.: Leonard Worth 

Sect.: Mildred Greif 

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Angus Cathie 



120 



INTERNAL MEDICINE 

SOCIETY 



The Society of Internal Medicine which was organized in P.C.O. in 1951 has as 
its purpose the promotion of interest in this specialty. At each regular meeting, a 
guest speaker elaborates on one of the aspects of this broadening medical field. 
Students are kept abreast of the modern advancements in clinical medicine and aided in 
developing a skill of their own in physical diagnosis. 

Membership is open to any student from the second semester of the sophomore year 
up to and including the first four weeks of the senior year and awards are given to each 
eligible member in the form of a certificate at the close of the senior year. To be 
eligible, a member must have been in good standing in the society for at least two con- 
secutive semesters. 

Pres. : Donald Baxter 

Vice Pres.: Eleanor Masterson 

Sect.-Treas.: Elliot B. Port 

Faculty .Advisor: Dr. William Daiber 

Senior Members: Joseph Andrews, William Betts, Jr., Bruce Bochman, William Bradway, James 
Breslin, David Bronstein, James Chimerakis, Robert DeRue, Robert England, Alan Fallick, Jay 
Friedlin, Robinson Fry, Albert Golin, Eugene Heagen, William Hemsley, Jr., Rodney Jacobsen, 
Donald Ketner, Edward Love, Joseph Makant, Jr., Murray Matez, Robert Meals, Frederick 
Melhorn, Milton Metzman, Edward Minehan, Stanley Orons, John Polulich, II, William Rusin, 
Sanford Sadick, Henry Salkind, Edward Swiatowski, Herbert Wiener, Joseph Yurkanin, Frank 
Zaccardi. 






Senior Members: Donald Baxter, William Betts, Jr., Bruce Bochman, William Bradway, James 
Breslin, David Bronstein, James Chimerakis, Jerome Cohen, John Crawford, John DeGhetto, 
Alvin Dubin, Robert England, Alan Fallick, Frederic Friedlin, Edward Friedman, Robinson Fry, 
Julius Glover, Albert Golin, Donald Greif, Thomas Griffith, Frederick Grossbart, Eugene Heagen, 
William Hemsley, John Hippie, Samson Inwald, Rodney Jacobsen, Frederick Jaeger, Jay Joseph, 
David Kellam, Carl Kodroff, Charles Kroh, Jack Levitt, Henry Liebert, Arthur Lodato, John Love, 
Ralph Luongo, Joseph Makant, Nick Marino, Charles Marra, Leo Martsukis, Murray Matez, 
Robert Meals, Frederick Melhorn, Lois Moll, Stanley Orons, David Patriquin, Howard Peckins, 
Seymour Piwoz, Thomas Powell, Charles Pritchard, Walter Robinson, Sanford Sadick, Henry 
Salkind, Ralph Schwartz, George Slifer, Paul Snoke, Rchard Snyder, James Sullivan, Barry Walp, 
Herbert Wiener, John Wildmann, Warren Young, Frank Zaccardi, Abraham Zellis. 



SOCIETY of OBSTETRICS 
and GYNECOLOGY 



The Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology is an approved undergraduate organi- 
zation founded for the purpose of, "meeting regularly to further the knowledge of 
obstetrics and gynecology, and to promote further opportunity for its members to 
become acquainted with the progressively newer developments arising in the fields of 
obstetrics and gynecology." 

Membership in the society is open to all members of the junior and senior classes. 
Members of the senior class, after meeting the requirements of the society, and after 
presenting a paper on an approved subject, are eligible to receive the society's certificate. 

Senior members are given the opportunity to visit the Philadelphia Planned Parent- 
hood Clinic on Tuesday and Thursday nights which are reserved for our group. Each 
senior member has the opportunity to attend the clinic at least once. We feel the 
observation at these sessions is quite valuable and each year the society donates twenty- 
five dollars to the clinic. 




Pres.: Donald Ketner 



Vice Pres.: Edward Mineha 
Sect.: Alexander Xenakis 
Treas.: John Wynne, Jr. 



122 



PEDIATRICS SOCIETY 




Pres.: Richard Snyder 

Vice Pres.: Carl Kodroff 
Sect.: Lois Gehris Moll 
Treas.: Arthur Lodato 



The purpose of this society sh.ill be, "to meet reguhirly to promote interest among 
the students in the study of pediatrics and to provide further opportunity for its 
members to become acquainted with this field of study." 

The functions of the society are two fold: (1) to promote interest among the 
students in the study of pediatrics and (2) to prepare and set up a plan whereby out 
patient pediatric house calls are adequately and efficiently answered. All house calls 
to registered pediatric clinic patients are taken care of by senior members of the society. 
Their work is supervised by the pediatric resident. One junior member of the society 
is assigned with the senior member, so that he may observe and gain experience in the 
work. 

Membership shall be open to all students who have successfully completed the 
sophomore year of academic work. At the completion of the senior year, if the society 
member is in good standing and has met all the requirements as set down by the pediatric 
and student council constitutions, he is eligible for the society's certificate showing that 
he has done extra work in this field. 



Senior Members: Bruce Bochman, James Breslin, David Bronstein, Jay Joseph, Donald Ketner, 
Nick Marino, Robert Meals, Welden Pyle, Jr., Charles Pritchard, David Patriquin, Walter 
Robinson, Jr., Paul Snoke, Paul Sadick, Barry Walp, John Wynne, Jr., Herbert Wiener, Warren 
Young, Jr., Joseph Yurkanin. 





Senior Members: Gerald Cotler, Alvin Dubin, Robert England, Alan Fallick, Edward Friedman, 
Albert Golin, Donald Greif, William Hemsley, Jr., Jay Joseph, Jack Levitt, Charles Marra, Robert 
Meals, Frederick Melhorn, Leo Martsukis, Stanley Orons, William Rusin, Irvin Smith, Edward 
Swiatkowski, Herbert Wiener, Sanford Sadick, Ralph Schwartz, Ralph Zaroff. 



''NEURO-PSYCH" SOCIETY 



Popular demand and interest on the part of the student body of the college stimu- 
lated the reorganization of the Neuropsychiatric society this year after a two year period 
of inactivity. The latest addition to the department of neuropsychiatry in the college 
and hospital. Dr. Albert L. Weiner, served as advisor to the society. We are indebted 
to Dr. Weiner for his active participation in aiding the society in arranging a most 
interesting educational series of lecture programs throughout the year. The purpose of 
the program this year was to stress the principles of the various techniques used in the 
different schools of psychotheraputic approach. Each of the lecture programs were 
enthusiastically received by the student body and in the future there will be many more 
constructive programs given by the society in order to promote understanding and 
appreciation of mental illness and its treatment, one of the most significant problems of 
our time. 




Pres.: Seymour Piwoz 



Vice Pres.: Milton Metzman 

Sect.: Franklin Stein 

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Albert Weiner 



124 




I] 



1956 




PHILADELPHIA 
COLLEGE OF 
OSTEOPATHY 




MISS IRMA J. REESE, R.N 
Director of Nurses 



^ «•«'• 



\ 



SARA SEARIGHT, R.N. 

Assistant Director, Nursing Serv- 
ice, North Center 

Diploma, Osteopathic Hospital of 
Philadelphia School of Nursing 




IRMA JEANNETTE REESE, R.N. 

Acting Director, School of Nursing and Nursing 
Service 

Diploma, Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia 
School of Nursing 

B.S. in Nursing Education, University of Penn- 
sylvania 



EDNA LEAR, R.N. 
Obstetrical Instructor 
Diploma, Craig Colony 




P 



HAZEL A. GREINER, R.N. 

Night Supervisor (48th St. Hos- 
pital) 

Diploma, Osteopathic Hospital of 
Philadelphia School of Nursing 








BEATRICE KISTLER KISH, R.N. 

Science Instructor 

Diploma, Petersburg Hospital 
School of Nursing 

B.S. in Nursing Education, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 




CATHERINE WOODS, R.N. 'N'jfjfi'//' 



College and hospital officials meet. 



Evening Supervisor (48th St. Hos- 
pital) 

Diploma, Misericordia Hospital 
School of Nursing 



126 







i 





RUTH KELLY, R.N. 
Operating Room Instructor 
Diploma, University of Pennsyl- 
vania School of Nursing 



MARGARET BRESLYN 

Clinical Instructor 

Diploma, College of St. Teresa, Winona, Minn. 



The Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1911. At this time one 
of its stated purposes was, "to conduct a training school for nurses." A lack of sufficient 
facilities at that time delayed organization until 1917. The course of instruction at 
first was two years, which was later increased to the present three-year course. The 
first class graduated in 1919, with three students. Originally, students entering the 
school made their own uniforms from gingham, with a white apron, black shoes and 
stockings and spats. At the present time, the uniforms are tailor made and white shoes 
and stockings are worn. In 1931, the school became accredited by the Pennsylvania 
State Board of Nurse Examiners. In the same year, the school became affiliated with the 
Philadelphia General Hospital for medical and pediatric nursing. In 1948, medical 
nursing was replaced with psychiatric nursing. 

Then as now, the philosophy of the only college-associated school of nursing in the 
profession is that all students shall be given the opportunity for development. Students 
are urged to contribute to the service and welfare of the school of nursing, but at the 
same time, freedom and initiative are encouraged. The trainees are given every advan- 
tage and opportunity to become physically, emotionally and intellectually stable. Spiritual 
and professional aspects are given great consideration by providing the necessary condi- 
tions favorable for learning, supplying guidance, stimulation and a measure of control so 
that these goals may be met. The student is urged to do her own adjusting and must 
learn to be self directed and self disciplined. 

Television sets and recreation rooms provided for the student nurses, as well as 
participation in numerous social activities of the college, add much to the social aspect 
of their three years of training. The student nurse may join the Glee Club (made up of 
students from the college and nurses,) play basketball against other nursing schools, 
sponsor parties and dances, or avail herself of the unique social and cultural facilities 
of the city of Philadelphia. 

Equipped with this training and development, the student is better able to con- 
tribute to society and tend to the needs of humanity. 

THERESA DAVEY, R.N. SARAH M. ACHEY, R.N. 

Operating Room Supervisor (20th Night Supervisor (20th St. Hos- 

St. Hospital) pital) 

Diploma, Osteopathic Hospital of Diploma, Women's Homeopathic 

Philadelphia School of Nursing Hospital of Philadelphia 




M 





GAIL ADAMS, R.N. 
Assistant Evening Supervisor 
Diploma, Osteopathic Hospital of 
Philadelphia School of Nursing 



DOROTHY KOEHN, R.N. 
Head Nurse, Maternity (20th St. 
Hospital) 




INEZ HARRINGTON, R.N. 

Evening Supervisor (20th St. 
Hospital) 

Diploma, Grady Memorial Hospi- 
tal School of Nursing, Atlanta, 
Ga. 




SENIOR NURSES 



SARA ANN BLANK, R.N 



who is a native of Philadelphia; a member 
of the Glee Club and plans to do general staff 
nursing at the 4Sth Street Osteopathic Hospi- 
tal; Sara became a Mrs. in June . . . 





nd JUDITH LOUISE BRANNICK, R.N 



. . . who is from Michigan; Secretary of Student 
Council, a member of the Glee Club, SNAP 
representative; Judy is planning on general staff 
nursing at the 48th Street Osteopathic Hospi- 
tal .. . 



I 




and JOYCE DIANE BURY, R.N 



. . . who is from Clayton, Missouri; Treasurer 
of Student Council, Class Vice-President, a 
member of the Glee Club; Joyce is undecided 
about location, but plans to do general duty . . . 



128 






n d 




INEZ ANN CRANE, R.N 



. . . who is from Wyandotte, Michigan; is Class 
Treasurer, a member of the Judiciary Committee 
and the Basketball Team; plans to do general 
duty at Art Centre Hospital in Detroit . . . 



nd JOANNE ORA HALL, R.N 



. . . who is a native of Philadelphia; a member 
of the Glee Club, Jo is planning a future of 
Operating or Delivery Room nursing in Texas . . . 





and VIRGINIA ANN JONES, R.N 



. . . who is from Detroit, Michigan; a member 
of the Glee Club; Ginny is particularly inter- 
ested in Pediatric nursing . . . 



129 



nd WANDA KLINEHAN , R.N 



. . . who is from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; was 
Class Secretary, a member of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee and the Glee Club; Wanda plans on doing 
general duty after graduation . . . 





BARBARA SUSAN LAIB, R.N 



. . . who is from Upper Darby, Pennsylvania; 
is President of Student Council, Senior Class 
President, a member of the Glee Club and the 
Judiciary Committee; Barb is interested in gen- 
eral duty . . . 



and BETTY JANE SMITH, R 



. . . who is from Michigan, is Secretary of Stu- 
dent Council, Chairman — Judiciary Committee 
and Nursing School Editor of the Synapsis; 
Betty is interested in becoming an Operating 
Room nurse . . . 



130 






nd LOLA EDNA STONE, R.N 



. . . who is from Bedford, Pennsylvania; is 
Senior Class Secretary and a member of the Glee 
Club. Lola is interested in surgical nursing . . . 



nd PAULINE CECELIA SWEIGART , R.N. . 



. . . who is from Ephrata, Pennsylvania; a 
member of the Student Council, the Glee Club 
and a Cheerleader; Pauline plans on general duty 
at Lancaster Osteopathic Hospital or further 
education . . . 





and MARGARET UHLER, R.N 



. . . who is from Hopeland, Pennsylvania; a 
member of Student Council and the Glee Club; 
Margaret plans on doing general duty in Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, and then to missionary 
work . . . 



131 



WINIFRED MAE WHEELER R. 



• . . who is from Easton, Pennsylvania; a mem- 
ber of the Glee Club and a Cheerleader; Winnie 
is interested in surgical nursing, possibly at 
Allentown Osteopathic Hospital 




INTERMEDIATE CLASS NURSES . . 




PHYLISS J. SEIBERT 



BETTY A. STAUFFER 



CAROLYN V. WASSELL 



LEANNE J. WOOD 



JANE E. WHITESIDE 




134 



136 




Marie Bybel 




Patricia Marie Sayres 



Sally Alice Struse 



Nancy Joan Weinert 



137 






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The Light of Knowledge 

CONGRATULATIONS to you upon your graduation! Our best wishes go with you as you embark upon 
your chosen profession. 

vou HAVE, indeed, selected well and wisely your life work. In the entire realm of endeavor there 
are few callings that offer such opportunities for helping your fellow men. 

THE KNOWLEDGE that you bring with you into your new profession will enable you to bring 
comfort and relief to many and aside from the deep spiritual satisfaction this will bring 
you, there will be the material reward that follows a successful practice. 

FOR OVER a quarter century Vitaminerals has devoted its services and its products to aid the 
newcomer as well as the old established practitioner in the art of healing. 

DURING ALL this time the supplementary dietary aids supplied by Vitaminerals have always been 
kept at the very highest peak of quality. Constant vigilance and never ceasing research 
have enabled Vitaminerals to maintain and improve the effectiveness and therapeutic 
value of these formulas so that they have never been surpassed in the entire field of 
nutrition. 

WE HOPE you will feel free to call u|)on us for any services or information we can give. In the 
meantime meet your Vitaminerals Distributor. He is our Field Technician whose knowl- 
edge of modern clinical nutrition is deep and authoritative and he will gladly place it at 
your disposal. He is a good man to know. 




GLENDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



141 



"For the Conservation 
of Life'' 



DARTELL 
LABORATORIES 

LOS ANGELES 15, CAL. 



Division 

of 

MERCK 

& 

CO., 

Inc. 



Organic Vitamins and Minerals 

that are ")ust naturally 

better" 



Distributors 

SAMUEL LIOON 
721 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, Pa. 

VINCENT SMULDIS 
611 N. 6th Street Allentown, Pa. 

ROBERT N. COATES 
83 7 Emerson Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



LOUIS MILNER 

Established 1919 

• 

o 

Apothecary 
4400 Chestnut Street 

EVer green 6-4400 



Surgical Supplies 
108 South 44th Street 

BAring 2-5108 



RENT OR SELL: Wheel Chairs, Walkers, 
Hospital Beds, Etc. 

FITTING ROOMS FOR: Trusses, Supports, 
Stockings, Etc. 



Partners in Health: 

YOUR HOSPITAL 

YOUR DOCTOR 

BLUE CROSS 

and 

BLUE SHIELD 



142 




Research, development, and production of medicine 

Smith, Kline & French 
serving physicians since 1841 . „,.,,,,. 

Laboratories, Fnilacleipnia 



143 



^0^ g M # EXCLUSIVELY FOR 

SmUHt^i CHILDREN 

^^r ^ WWW^ fW^ ^ ^r-^^ ^^ jn miss 4 8,5 joys 

^ ~^js IN REGULAR OR CORREaiVE SHOES 

CORRECT THESE CO NDITIONS 

Rx DOCTORS' ( / j \ 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

CAREFULLY 
FILLED 

Where SHOES Are 

■FinED" 
Not Merely SOLD 

\ / 





PIGEON TOES 

AGINCY FOR JStRIDeRtTE SHOES 
213-15 SO. 52nd ST. ^^-'~~ 



Between Locust & Walnut Sl< 



PHI LA. 

Open Wed, Fri. & Sat. Evenings 



NICHOLAS J. REILLY 

Medical Books S) Publications 

5 80 5 Fernwood Street 

PHILADELPHIA 43, PA. 

• 

Agent for Williams & Wilkins Co., Lea 2) 

Febiger, Yearbook Co., MacMilLni, 

and McGran-Hill 

GRanite 2-6721 



JOHN J. GUARENTE 

Sculptors - Stone Carvers 

Modelers 

Creative Sculptural and Architectnral Com- 
missions in Marble, Granite and Limestone 
for Oier Thirty Years. 
Specialists in Figure Caning, Ornamentation 
and Architectural Lettering. 



2 5 08 North 27th Street 

Philadelphia 3 2, Pa. SAgamore 2-4666 



WALNUT PHARMACY 
4847 Walnut Street 

"As close as your Physician 

As close as your Hospital 

As close as your Profession" 

• 

Seriing the Osteopathic Physicians' 

Prescription Needs for }0 Years 

GRanite 6-0777 



ORTHOPEDIC 
SHOE SHOP 

JOHN A. QUEROLI 

Shoe Consultants for the 
Osteopathic Profession 



COMPLIMENTS 



A FRIEND 



Western Saving Fund Building 

S.E. Corner Broad and 
Chestnut Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 

Suite 627 to 623 
Phone: KIngsley 5-0288 



146 



WYETH RESEARCH ... 




In its new quarters at Radnor, Pennsylvania, the Wyeth Institute for Medical 
Research offers the most advanced facilities for pharmaceutical investigation. 
It is here that Wyeth's men of science endlessly explore physics and chemistry 
to find new tools for men of medicine. By these labors, the Wyeth Institute 
gives life to the pharmaceutical industry's concept of service. This is why the 
Wyeth Shield is a symbol of pharmaceutical progress throughout the world. 



Philadelphia 1, Pa. 



147 



195 6 Graduates 



JUNIOR CLASS 
P.C.O. STUDENT NURSES 



New Piggy-Back Papermate 



Pen— $1.95 



STATIONERS 

CR 6-4600 52nd BELOW WALNUT 



Established 1897 

HENRY SAUR 

COMPANY 

INC. 

Manufacturers of 

Orthopedic and Surgical 

Appliances 



KIngsley 6-0889 

^ BUDGET 
UNIFORM 
CENTER 

Uniforms of Distinction 

• 

1215 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 

• 

Branch: 
5210 Chestnut Street 



Academic 
Gotvns - Hoods - Caps 

made by 

COTRELL & LEONARD, INC. 

Established 1832 

Albany 1 , New York 

Suppliers to 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathy 



515-517 North Eighth Street 
PHILADELPHIA 2 3, PA. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

OF THE P.C.O. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 



148 




when other 
external therapy 
seems to get 

nowhere... 



accelerate healing 



with 




study , after study after study 
corroborates the "notable"' success of 
Desitin Ointment in easing pain and 
stimulating smooth tissue repair in lacerated, 
denuded, chafed, irritated, ulcerated 
tissues — often in stubborn conditions 
where other therapy fails. 



DESITIN 



CHEMICAL COMPANY 

70 Ship Street, Providence 2, R. I. 



DESITIN 

OINTMENT 

the pioneer external 
cod liver oil therapy 



wounds 

(especially slow healing) 

burns 
ulcers 

(decubitus, varicose, diabeticl 






WILSON & SHELDON 



1{ Opticians Vy 



POWERS & REYNOLDS 

'Pharmacists 
For Half a Century 



203 2 Chestnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA 3, PA. 



You're Sure to Look Your Best in Williai 
Made to Measure Uniforms 
Stop in, Phone or Write for Samples 
and Prices 

C. D. WILLIAMS & COMPANY 

Designers and Manufacturers Since 1876 

246 South 11th Street 

PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 
PEnnypacker 5-1580 



45 th and Spruce Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 4, PA. 



COMMERCIAL PHOTO 
SERVICE 

Cameras - Projectors 
Photo Supplies 
Photo Finishing 

24 Hour Service 
• 

472 8 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA 39, PA. 
Phone: GRanite 4-3200 



149 




im 



.: ^^ 



^g r r p /I ji 



w w 










l». 




An - oth - er whoop - ee! _ 
•whoop- eel 



V, 




GO! GO! GO! 


"'^t 




BAring 2-8922 • ' \ 


GULF 


Cull mid Delivery Service''-—- — 


• 


MIAMI CLEANERS 


For That Good Gulf 


& STORAGE 


Service 




ED MCLAUGHLIN'S 


Known for Finer Cleaning 


GULF SERVICE 


1 Hour Service 


48th and Spruce 
Streets 


* 




245-247 South 40th Street 


GRanite 2-9907 


^•PHILADELPHIA 4, PA. 


DAN LUONGO'S 


J 


WELCOME 


ATLANTIC 




SERVICE 


TO THE 


49th and Spruce Streets 


P. C. O. 


West Philadelphia's 
^^Brand Name" Station 




Specializing in 




"Brand Name" Products 


ALUMNI 


and 




Atlantic Car Conditioning 


ASSOCIATION 


Service 
• 




GRanite 2-9593 



152 



Dinner Served Daily 5-7:30, Sundays 1-7 
Closed Wednesdays 

SLICK'S TEA ROOM 
4920 Hazel Avenue 

We Cater to Church Suppers 

Call Us for Fancy Tea Sandiviches 

SHcrwood 7-6148 

Mrs. Fanny Slick, Proprietor 



ROSENBERG'S 
SHOES 

139 S. 52nd St. 2 004 S. 7th St. 

4602 Frankford Ave. 

Featuring Professional 
Red Cross Shoes 

10 Per Cent Discount Cards Issued to 
Students, Graduates and Staff 



RIVERSIDE HOSPITAL 



HANSON HOUSE 
4824 Spruce Street 



Clifton Park Manor 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 



Steaks & Chops - Sea Food 
Cold Platters - Sandiviches 

• 
Choice Wines ^ Liquors 



ling i5an 
Eesitaurant 



4 8 3 2 Spruce Street 

• 



SH 7-2296 



GR 2-9982 



FAMOUS ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 

Serving Full Course Lunch and Dinners 

Home-Made Ravioli and Lasagne 

PIZZA PIES MADE ANY STYLE 

(2 5 Varieties) 

Orders To Take Out 

316 South 48 th Street 

Ranite 6-3 564 




Gulf Fuel Oil 
Quiet May Oil Heating 



Cofftpliments 



J. E. KUNKEL 
63 rd and Market Streets 



GRanite 6-2800 



WEGLEIN ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



153 





Working Toward 
the Advancement 

of the Prof ession 

Through 

Brotherhood 



OF 1956 




154 



Cofttplifttents 



ALLENTOWN 
OSTEOPATHIC 



HOSPITAL 



17 3 6 Hamilton Street 



ALLENTOWN, PENNA. 



Compli-ments 
of 

JUNIATA PARK 
MEDICAL CENTER, 

INC. 




1100 East Lycoming Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Congratulations 

The tools of progress are a friendly people 

and a thriving community 

We boast of these accomplishments 



The West Side 
Osteopathic Hospital 

of 
York, Pennsylvania 



Courtesy 



METROPOLITAN 
HOSPITAL 



STAFF 



Our claim to a progressive hospital is a 
direct result of these tools! 



An Osteopathic Institution 



155 



Complhnents 


Cofttplivients 
of 


of 


DELAWARE VALLEY 




HOSPITAL 


RIVERVIEW 


AN 


OSTEOPATHIC 


OSTEOPATHIC 


HOSPITAL 


INSTITUTION 

• 


STAFF 


Wilson Avenue and Pond Street 




BRISTOL, PA. 



HOSPITAL 

FOOD MANAGEMENT, 

INC. 

Lombard at 25 th Street 

PHILADELPHIA 46, PENNSYLVANIA 

• 

Aiding Hospital Management by Assuming Responsibility 

for the Complete Food Service in Hospitals 

• 

Managers of the Food Service at 

THE OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITALS OF PHILADELPHIA 

48 th and Spruce Streets and North Center 



158 



Success to the Students of the 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathy 

• 

DEWEY'S FAMOUS 

(No Better Food at Any Price) 



THEY COME FROM EVERYWHERE FOR 

JIM AND MILLIE'S 

Steaks and Hoagies 

Best Milk Shake in Toivn 
Ask for Jim's Italian Specials 



MOM'S LUNCHEONETTE 

Steaks - Hoagies 
Sandtviches 



62 nd and Noble Streets 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
SHerwood 7-9839 SHerwood 7-6615 



4813 Locust Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SHerwood 7-9663 



KEL'S BEAUTY SALON 
473 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA 39, PA. 



SHerwood 7-9713 

MOE MARCUS 

Complete Automotive Service 

state Inspection 
"Washing, Greasing, Simonizing 
Expert Paint and Metal Work 



Open Thursday and Friday En 
Closed Monday 



4619 Walnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 39, PA. 



FROM YOUR STUDENT DAYS . . . 

throughout your professional career you can rely on 
WILLIAMS, BROWN & EARLE, INC. 

TOR THE FINEST MEDICAL LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND COMPLETE 

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS AND SUPPLIES 

Microscopes - Stethoscopes - Blood Pressure Equipment - Diagnostic and 

General Clinical Equipment - Medical Cameras 

Photomicrographic Equipment 

904-06 CHESTNUT STREET 

WA 3-1800 PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 



159 



LYON & ARMOR, INC. 

PRINTERS 

For Over T hree-quarters of a Century 
• 

SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY LETTERPRESS 

CATALOGS MAGAZINES 

GENERAL COMMERCIAL WORK 

• 

147-51 North Tenth Street 
WAlnut 2-02 34 Philadelphia 7, Pa. 

Complifnents 

of 

FARROW OSTEOPATHIC HOSPITAL 

ERIE, PA. 



T O W N E ' S 

Sportswear - Dresses 

Blouses - Stveaters - Lingerie 

• 

4742-44 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA 3 9, PA. 



BERLIN'S 

West Phila.'s Most Complete 
Variety Store 

• 

4820-22 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
GRanite 6-4806 



160 




161 



COOKLYN DAIRIES, 
INC. / , 



3 228 Dickinson Street 



PHILADELPHIA 46, PA. 



On the Wrtj to the Shore . , . 

LAUREL ROAD COMMUNITY 
CHURCH 

Laurel Road and Fifth Avenue 

Laurel Manor, Laurel Springs, N. J. 

Rev. Robert W. England, A.B., B.D., D.O. 

Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 A. M. 

Morning Worship 11:00 A. M. 

Radio Broadcast 2:00 P. M. 

(WVCH, 740' k.c.) 

Bible Club (Wednesday) 3:30 P. M. 

"We Preach Christ, Crucified, Risen and 
Coming Again" 



LODATO'S PHARMACY 



Prescription Specialists 



825 POND STREET 

BRISTOL, PA. 




^^ Where Quality Counts" 



Cofftplivtents 
of 

HARRISBURG 

OSTEOPATHIC 

HOSPITAL 

• 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Compliments 



BILL HENNING 



Pharmaceutical Representative 



162 



HAIL — FAREWELL — AU REVOIR 

The College Administration, our Board, our 
Faculty, our Hospital Staff, join in congratula- 
tions to the Synapsis Staff and to the Graduating 
Class of 1956. 

As physicians in the field of practice, we know 
you will be faithful to the ideals and the ide- 
ology herein personalized. We know that the 
scenes herein portrayed will live with you al- 
ways and always background your own indi- 
vidual lives of service to humanity. 



PHILADELPHIA 

COLLEGE 

OF 

OSTEOPATHY 



163 



official Photographer 

Class of 56 

• 

WALTER M. FAUST 

Photographer 

• 

6039 Kingsessing Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA 42, PA. 
SAratoga 9-1506 


Professional Liability 
Insurance 

Serving the Profession Nation-wide 
Since 1925 

• 

Exclusively Endorsed by the A.O.A, 
Since 1934 

• 

Experienced claims handling protects the 
doctor's professional reputation; broad 
policy provisions backed by millions in 
assets, protect his financial position — 
present and future. 

• 

THE NETTLESHIP 
COMPANY 

1212 Wiltshire Boulevard 

LOS ANGELES 17, CALIF. 


Cofttplifnents 

of 
PENNA. LAUNDRY 


CONGRATULATIONS DOCTORS! 

The Officers and Members of the 

PENNSYLVANIA OSTEOPATHIC 

ASSOCIATION 

Greet you and wish you every success in your 
career as an Osteopathic Physician and Surgeon 

• 

IF YOU WILL INTERN IN PENNSYLVANIA, OR INTEND TO PRACTICE 
HERE AFTER INTERNSHIP, YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO JOIN 
YOUR PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY. MEMBERSHIP IS FREE DURING IN- 
TERNSHIP, RESIDENCY AND FIRST YEAR OF PRACTICE. WRITE THE 
PENNSYLVANIA OSTEOPATHIC ASSOCIATION, 1941 MARKET STREET, 
HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA, FOR AN APPLICATION. 



164 



J. E. LIMEBURNER CO. 

Guild Opticians 



1923 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 3, PA. 



KEN HAYDON 



Hospital and College 
Vending Service 



STATE • CITY • MUNICIPAL 

Manholes • Inlets • Catch Basins • Cesspools 
Underground Chambers • All Types of Casting 

JOSEPH LIBERATI 

SEWER — BRICKLAYER — CONTRACTOR 

State Road & Penna. R.R. 

FLanders 2-1454 UPPER DARBY, PA. 




A Yearbook Staff with ideals 

plus 

A Publisher who Cares 

equals 

A Yearbook of Excellence A 



QUAUFIED 




LOcust 4-6171 



WILLIAM t. til 



LETTERPRESS • E N G R A V I fl • IFT^ E 



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